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Meet Curtis Brown

Curtis Brown
My time at Garrett-Evangelical has given me excellent resources to be a clergyperson in the secular, public sphere through engagement with community organizations and political movements.

Curtis Brown 

Doctor of Ministry in Community Organizing 

What is your hometown and educational background?
Right now, I live in Lacey, Washington, just outside of Olympia. I was born in Anchorage, Alaska, but I’ve lived all over the United States and Europe. My undergraduate degree is in religion, philosophy, and literature from the University of Evansville in Indiana. I have a Master of Divinity from Boston University School of Theology with a focus in systemic theology. 

How has your time at Garrett-Evangelical shaped your ministry and calling? 
My study at Garrett- Evangelical has focused on the impact of the practices and principles of community organizing on ministry. My time at Garrett-Evangelical has given me excellent resources to be a clergyperson in the secular, public sphere through engagement with community organizations and political movements. In my current ministry as a denominational staff member resourcing new United Methodist churches, I am better equipped to provide training, coaching, and consulting to a new generation of spiritual entrepreneurs. 

What is your most transformative experience at Garrett-Evangelical?
My most transformative experience has been the relationships that I have developed with my fellow students and professors. One of the benefits of a Doctor in Ministry program is the opportunity to step back from the regularity of ministry responsibility, connect with other talented and courageous church leaders, and learn from the perspectives and contexts of others. My cohort of fellow students in community organizing is a remarkable group of people, and we have been blessed with great instruction and mentorship from our advisor, Rev. Dr. Angela Cowser. 

What are your plans or your hopes for your future? 
I intend to continue in my current work, which is focused on resourcing new church planting through The United Methodist Church. New churches and new faith communities are the evolutionary edge of the church because they experiment with innovative ways of connecting people with Christ and with each other through Christian community. It’s a privilege to support the creative and dedicated leaders of these new churches, and I expect that my studies and research at Garrett- Evangelical will provide additional tools that will bene t my work in coaching and consulting with them.