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Contact Us

Mailing Address
2121 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60201

Phone: (847) 866-3900
Toll-Free: (800) SEMINARY
Fax: (847) 866-3884
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About Us

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is a graduate school of theology related to The United Methodist Church. It is located a few miles north of Chicago on the Evanston campus of Northwestern University. Garrett-Evangelical is the result of the interweaving of three institutions:

  • Garrett Biblical Institute, the first Methodist seminary in the Midwest, was established in 1853 by largely the same church people who founded Northwestern. Founders hoped that the school would shape mind and spirit toward an educated ministry.
  • The Chicago Training School, established in 1885, was an important force for women in ministry and for developing service agencies throughout Chicago. CTS merged with GBI in 1934.
  • Evangelical Theological Seminary, located in Naperville and founded as a seminary of the Evangelical Church (later the Evangelical United Brethren) in 1873, joined with Garrett Theological Seminary in 1974 to form Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary.

These institutional histories live on in our core values of critical and creative reason, evangelical commitment, and prophetic participation in society.

Core Purpose

The core purpose of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is to know God in Christ and, through preparing spiritual leaders, to help others know God in Christ.

Mission Statement

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is a graduate theological school that prepares skilled, bold and articulate leaders who share the transforming love of Jesus Christ. Related to the United Methodist Church, with an ecumenical and international reach, we prepare leaders who are equipped to live and proclaim the Gospel and to teach in diverse congregations and educational settings. Our teaching and learning settings will be places of hospitality where we pursue respect and reconciliation in all encounters.

Educational Effectiveness

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is a graduate school of theology that prepares skilled, bold and articulate leaders who share the transforming love of Jesus Christ.  Related to The United Methodist Church, with an ecumenical and international reach, we prepare leaders who are equipped to live and proclaim the Gospel and to teach in diverse congregations and educational settings.  To this end, measuring the educational effectiveness of our programs is Garrett-Evangelical’s ongoing commitment. 

Evaluating educational effectiveness is an iterative and ongoing process carried out by our Office of Institutional Assessment.  We continually seek to improve our pedagogy and the educational quality of programs for our students.  The assessment work of the seminary ranges from interviews with alumni/ae to the gathering of data for metrics that are reviewed several times a year.  On an annual basis we carefully review the data made available to us from the Association of Theological Schools through the Graduate Student Questionnaire and utilize that information as one of many bases for our continuous improvement of curricula and student services.  We also look to our significant markers for student learning for keys to improving our degree program pedagogy.  For example, each degree program requires a mid-program evaluation that guides students toward successful completion of the program.  Every three years the seminary reviews the mid-program evaluations themselves in order to evaluate how well the degree program is meeting student needs for learning.  These, as well as other, evaluation tools are employed on a set and continuous schedule in order to identify educational effectiveness issues as they arise.  A key component of this schedule is the tracking of graduation rates and the average length of time for the completion of a degree. 


Basic information by the various degrees offered and completion rates are as follows:
 

Master of Divinity (MDiv)
This professional degree for pastoral vocation provides the academic qualification for ordination as elder or deacon by The United Methodist Church and other denominations.  The MDiv offers students the opportunity to choose from ten different concentrations, such as urban ministry, youth ministry, social justice, and African-American Church Leadership.  In addition, the program prepares students with high academic achievement for doctoral studies in religion.  The current completion rate for the MDiv degree is 73% with an average completion time of 3.7 years.

Master of Arts (MA)
Master of Arts degrees equip students in the following areas of specialized ministry:
Christian Education, Music Ministry, Pastoral Care and Counseling, and Spiritual Formation and Evangelism.  These programs prepare students for leadership in congregations and agencies in specialized ministries.  They also meet educational requirements for those seeking ordination as deacons in The United Methodist Church and for elders preparing for specialized ministries.  The current completion rate for the MA degree is 75% with an average completion time of 3.4 years.

Master of Theological Studies (MTS)
This two-year degree program allows for specialization in a chosen area of research and provides preparation for doctoral study in religion.  It can be combined with a professional degree.  Areas of specialization include:  Old Testament, New Testament, History of Christianity, Theology and Ethics, Liturgy, and Religion and Personality.  The current completion rate for the MTS degree is 84% with an average completion time of 2.9 years.

Doctor of Ministry (DMin)
The DMin is an advanced degree in Christian ministry that prepares students for spiritual leadership in the church and enhances their competence as practical theologians.  The DMin reflects the seminary’s commitment to meeting the needs of leadership in the church and the serious theological reflection that is foundational to this task.  Tracks include:  Congregational Leadership, African-American Congregational Leadership, Spiritual Direction, and Mission in the Contemporary United States.  The current completion rate for the DMin degree is 57% with an average completion time of 5.6 years.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
This program prepares persons for teaching and research in theological seminaries, departments of religion in colleges and universities and church leadership.  PhD students may specialize in one of five program areas:  Biblical Studies; Christian Education and Congregational Studies; Liturgical Studies; Pastoral Theology, Personality, and Culture; and Theology, Ethics and History.  The current completion rate for the PhD degree is 72% with an average completion time of 6.3 years.

Accreditations

Garrett-Evangelical is accredited by two associations of schools, each with rigorous standards that challenge the seminary to assess its work in light of its mission and of common standards for excellent schools. We are accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada. The following degree programs are approved by the Association of Theological Schools: M.Div., M.A. in Christian Education, M.A. in Pastoral Care and Counseling, M.A. in Music Ministry, M.A. in Spiritual Formation and Evangelism, M.T.S., D.Min., and Ph.D.

The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools of the United States and Canada
10 Summit Park Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15275
412-788-6505
Fax: 412-788-6510
www.ats.edu

Regionally, it is accredited by:

Higher Learning Commission Mark of Affiliation      North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
(800) 621-7440

In addition, the seminary is on the approved seminary list and is regularly evaluated by the Commission on Theological Education of the University Senate of The United Methodist Church.

Connections

Northwestern University

Garrett-Evangelical and Northwestern University have a relationship that is almost a century and a half old. Common founders established both institutions to provide an educated ministry for an educated church. Over the decades, the institutions have shared numerous resources, including courses, buildings, faculties, libraries, parking, and technology.

Today, the Garrett-Evangelical learning community is deeply enhanced through its relationship with Northwestern:

  • Library resources and access (both physical and virtual);
  • E-mail and other forms of information technology;
  • Ph.D. coursework and dissertation advising;
  • Recreational facilities and opportunities;
  • International student assistance; 
  • Many cultural events and special lectures and programs.

The Association of Chicago Theological Schools

The Chicago area boasts the greatest concentration of seminaries per capita of anywhere in the U.S. The Chicago area schools are organized into a cluster called The Association of Chicago Theological Schools. Garrett-Evangelical is one of the 11 member schools. The ACTS website states:

Together, the schools within ACTS offer a rich network of resources for theological education, making the association one of the outstanding centers of theological education in the world. Available to the approximately 3,000 students currently enrolled at its member schools is a faculty of more than 350, more than 1,000 courses offered annually, and library collections of 1.7 million volumes and nearly 5,000 currently received periodical subscriptions.

Ecumenical Theological Seminary Program

Garrett-Evangelical cooperates with the Ecumenical Theological Seminary in Detroit in a program that enables students to take up to half of their work toward a Master's degree in Detroit. Students must take their first course on the Garrett-Evangelical campus. For more information contact the admissions or registrar's office.

Dual Degree in Social Work with Loyola University

Garrett-Evangelical and the School of Social Work of Loyola University of Chicago have a cooperative agreement for a dual degree program leading to the MSW at Loyola and the MDiv at Garrett-Evangelical. Selected courses may be applied to the respective degrees at each school. Students must be admitted to both schools.

SCUPE (Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education)

Garrett-Evangelical has a collaboration with SCUPE, which thinks prophetically and imaginatively about the direction of our global civilization as evidenced in our cities.

SCUPE offers experiential learning that allows the city to touch the heart and the heart to reach out to the city. Our academic courses prepare individuals with information and skills to become effective agents of transformation in our urban world.

Garrett-Evangelical offers an Urban Ministry Concentration. Seminary students take five courses through SCUPE, learning at sites throughout the city.

Concentrations and/or Certificate in Peace Studies from
Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary

Garrett-Evangelical and Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary (AMBS) have partnered to provide students at AMBS seeking ordination in the United Methodist Church the opportunity to earn a certificate in United Methodist Studies from Garrett-Evangelical. In return, AMBS will provide a set of courses for a concentration and/or certificate in Peace Studies for Garrett-Evangelical students.

Some of these courses will be made available online, some by intensive courses in January and the summer, and some during regular semester terms on the campuses in Evanston or Elkhart.  Another component of the partnership is that each school will also provide staff to advise students in fulfilling the expectations for these certificates.

Strategic Plan

For a .pdf copy click here.

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary
Prologue for Strategic Plan
Strategic Planning Task Force
May 12, 2011

Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is unique among theological schools.[1] We build on a remarkable legacy of preparing men and women for leadership that stretches back more than a century-and-a-half to 1854.  Graduates have provided leadership as pastors, scholars, chaplains and counselors, serving around the world and in diverse denominational settings.  Our purpose, to know God in Christ and, through preparing spiritual leaders, to help others know God in Christ, is central to our work.  Our mission continues: to prepare highly regarded and bold Christian leaders for the church, academy and world.  We understand ourselves to be a school that is of and for the church in sharing the transforming love of Christ in the world.

While the seminary’s primary influence has been in the United Methodist Church in the Midwest, Garrett-Evangelical graduates serve in many settings and a wide array of locales.   Today, the seminary looks to the future with considerable strength and resource.  Garrett-Evangelical is among a handful of theological seminaries positioned to dramatically shape the future of the church and theological education and extend its reach around the globe.

The many constituencies of the seminary have worked together with energy and imagination to implement the 2007 strategic plan.  Many of the goals outlined (an increased enrollment, additional faculty, improved facilities and growing financial resources) have been accomplished.  We now ask: How will we continue to strive for excellence in the future?  What will be our direction for the next five years?  How will we engage in a reflective process of celebrating our strengths, acknowledging our growing edges and building the community’s resolve toward greater excellence?  Since early 2010 a task force has given attention to a recalibration and refocusing of the 2007 plan as a way to proceed for the next five years.

We reaffirm the primary goals and assumptions from 2007 plan as foundational for the future.[2] The task of formation for students who chose Garrett-Evangelical is central to our work and we believe this is best provided in a residential format. The task force identified several strategic enablers for the seminary that set us apart as a school with enormous potential for the future.  These include the capacity for continued academic excellence, financial stability, an attractive and sustainable environment, the strategic use of emerging technologies and linkage with strategic partners in theological education.

As the nature and pace of change in theological education has quickened, the importance of our successful 2007 plan and the benefits of these strategic enablers has only increased.  These changes in the student pool and format of theological education, assisted by the economic downturn of 2008, destabilized many seminaries and threatened the viability of scores of academic institutions.  It is estimated that as many as 25% of the 250 theology schools currently accredited in North America may not survive the next decade.   In contrast, Garrett-Evangelical has moved against these trends in renovating facilities and welcoming the largest class of new students in decades for the fall of 2010 (over 120 new students!)[3]

The Strategic Planning Task Force is aware of these challenges and has considered ways to further sharpen how Garrett-Evangelical might best respond to these shifts in the environment while not losing the momentum gained in recent years.  It is our intention to focus institutional attention on five key strategies—essentially “how” we will marshal our resources to develop spiritual leaders for the service of God in Christ: 

1. The Garrett-Evangelical Leadership Life Cycle

This strategy focuses on our students from the point they consider Garrett-Evangelical, through matriculation and education to practicing alumni.  Garrett-Evangelical will expand its mission of education throughout the lives of our students/alumni and provide developmental and professional career support throughout their lives.  We will support our faculty in providing the highest quality of education.  We will build on programs like the MDiv Plus initiative with the Kellogg School of Management and the Institute for Transformative Leaders and Communities.   In turn, we will ask our alumni to become increasingly involved in the educational mission and support of Garrett.  

2. Academics

Academics remain a focal priority and our raison d’être. We have a very strong faculty who are creative teachers, well-published scholars, as well as nationally and internationally recognized.  The seminary will continue to support, develop, and recruit and retain these excellent colleagues. As we explore the possibility of new concentrations in the MDiv degree and possibly new MA foci, we also will continue to support our research degrees, the PhD and MTS, and continue the enhancement of the United Library in its learning and study spaces and in its collection.

  3. Community Outreach

We have long realized that our mission to build spiritual leaders need not be limited to Garrett-Evangelical students and alumni.  We have the ability to reach out to help spiritually develop laity, clergy and church leadership throughout the world.   To this end, we will continue to encourage international travel and educational study, such as our recent projects in Rome, South Africa, the Holy Land, Korea and China.  We will seek to serve non-traditional students and make our world-class library more accessible.  We will assist a growing number of degree students who explore non-congregationally based ministries.  This is a moment to position the seminary as world leader in quality, innovative theological education with initiatives to undergird our current classroom excellence with efforts to reach new audiences geographically and ecumenically.  New initiatives that open the prospect of greater worldwide influence include distance learning, lay education, new research projects and congregational resources.   

4. Emerging Learning Technologies

Our strategy for employing new learning technologies is a critical component in how we will reach out to new geographically, time and resource constrained audiences, as well as how we will enhance the educational experience of current students, alumni, new constituents, especially lay persons.  We are mindful that the distance learning technologies we employ are simply tools to our mission and that the educational experience must be enhanced and not diminished by their use.

5. Governance and Financial Resources

In these times of great change and challenge, we must ensure that our governance and supporting reporting systems are robust and dynamic.  We must further ensure that our resources are sufficient for and not significantly strained by our initiatives. We should work to ensure that as we increase our educational contributions to new groups that we also encourage them to assist in the support of the seminary.

As an institution and community, Garrett-Evangelical is blessed by the talents and vocational commitments of many.  We are preparing students who will be pastors, teachers, counselors, chaplains and persons who work in many ministries of mercy and justice.  As we consider how we best position the seminary for the next five years, the passage from Romans 12 seems to have particular pertinence.  Dr. K.K. Yeo, the Kendall Professor of New Testament at the seminary, has provided this translation:

Romans 12: 3-13

3/ By the grace given me I say to every one among you: do not be superminded of who you are, but be soberminded, according to the yardstick of faith that God has blessed us. 4/ Just as in a body there are many members, and all members do not have the same use, 5/ so we the many are one body in Christ, all individuals belong to the others as essential members. 6/ Through the grace of God we have different charismatic gifts, and let us use them:

if the gift of inspiring prophetic words, preach so according to the extent of our vision,
7/ if the gift of administration, serve wholeheartedly,
if the gift of teaching, teach and bless steadfastly,
8/ if the gift of exhortation, be wise in your counseling,
if the gift of giving, be generous in your stewardship,
if the gift of leading, be highly motivated and exemplary,
if the gift of doing the acts of mercy to those in distress, be cheerful and empathizing.

9/ Love is without pretense, therefore loath the evil, and cleave to the good. 10/ Let love of the Christian community exhibit in our mutual affection. Take the lead in honoring one another. 11/ Do not be slothful in our vocation, remaining effervescent in spirit, serving the Lord. 12/ Rejoice in hope, persevere in affliction, persist in prayer. 13/ Share in the needs of the church, be hospitable to strangers.  (Translation by K. K. Yeo, September 15, 2010)

We are each called to distinctive places of service and to communities that bear witness to the transforming love of Christ.  Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is a place where a community seeks to manifest the value of each person and where “all individuals belong to the others as essential members.”  The gifts outlined for leadership in Christian community and practices needed to be faithful in our vocations are set out in the passage from Romans.

What follows outlines future plans for Garrett-Evangelical to be a place of hospitality, hope and prayer as we provide a community that honors the diverse calls to ministry among us.  We have made great progress.  As our expanding enrollments, renovated facilities and excellent faculty demonstrate, we are advancing the mission of preparing exceptional Christian leaders for the future.  Let it be our prayer that our great potential will find expression in innovative ways, so that leaders in generations yet unborn will find at Garrett-Evangelical a school that provides them with the excellence we now celebrate and to which we continue to aspire.

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: RECRUITMENT AND MATRICULATION

YEAR

2011-
2016

 Increase the number of new Master of Divinity Degree students

  • See chart for details 

2012-
2013

 Increase total enrollment to an annual  FTE of 320 students in residence

  • Lower the yearly attrition rate into the single digits

2011-
2016

 Increase visibility

  • Create new brochures
  • Update Website
  • Expand use of social media in recruiting
  • Assess current marketing campaign and make recommendations
  • Develop and implement open houses 

2011-
2016

 Capture and maintain data to drive decision-making

  • Explore Jenzabar Vantage dashboards and CAPTURE programs to enhance data management and reporting across years 

2011-
2016

 Develop and deepen partnerships for recruitment efforts

  • Continue to build upon and expand recruitment visits
  • Work with Advanced Latin@ Theological Education (ALTE) and the Hispanic Advisory Council to increase Latino/a recruitment
  • Develop communication with college and university chaplains, Wesley Foundations, feeder churches and annual conferences
  • Develop alumni/ae recruitment associates program 

2011-
2012

 Develop and solidify policies and procedures

  • Create policy and procedures manuals for admissions and financial aid offices

2011-
2013

 Strengthen financial aid and scholarships

  • Assess needs of Financial Aid Department and make recommendations
  • Create new brochure (paper and online) to help students navigate financial aid and scholarships
  • Build upon and expand financial aid counseling, utilizing data and resources from Auburn Seminary’s studies on theological education and student indebtedness

2011-
2012

 Increase hospitality

 Provide seamless student service in recruiting, admissions, financial aid, and orientation processes 

  • Create new electronic orientation packet for new students (including financial aid planning tips) 
  • Begin Companions on the Journey program 
  • Assess campus visits and make improvements where needed 
  • Utilize student focus groups 

2012-
2013

 Begin exploring dual degree program with Loyola’s JD program

2013-
2014

 Begin exploring dual degree program with Loyola’s Master of Science in Nursing program


STRATEGIC PRIORITY: ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT STATISTICS

 

2011-2012

2012-2013

2013-2014

Degrees

New Student Goals

Total Enrollment

New Student Goals

Total Enrollment

New Student Goals

Total Enrollment

MDV

75

200

80

210

85

225

MA's

20

40

20

45

20

45

MTS

10

20

10

25

10

25

DMin

20-24

60

20-24

70

20-24

75

PhD

14-15

90

14-15

90

14-15

90

BGTS

25+

40

30+

55

30+

65

Certification

Enrichment

TOTALS

165+

450

175+

495

180+

525

FTE

300

320

340

2014-2015

2015-2016

Degrees

New Student Goals

Total Enrollment

New Student Goals

Total Enrollment

MDV

90

240

95

255

MA's

25

50

25

50

MTS

10

25

10

25

DMin

20-24

80

20-24

80

PhD

14-15

90

14-15

90

BGTS

30+

65

30+

70

Certification

Enrichment

TOTALS

190+

540

195+

570

FTE

350

370

STRATEGIC PRIORITY: EXCELLENCE IN ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND SUPPORT


YEAR

 PLANNING GOALS

2011-
2016

 Increase program support for educating Latino/a students

  • Become a receiving seminary for Seminary Consortium for Urban Pastoral Education (SCUPE)/Advanced Latin@ Theological Education (ALTE) program
  • Continue Hispanic Theological Institute Consortium membership
  • Continue participation in Hispanic Summer Program and host one in next five years
  • Identify dedicated scholarship/financial aid
  • Explore the Association of Chicago Theological Schools (ACTS) cooperatively-offered master’s level bilingual degrees 
  • Intentionally recruit Latino/a students 
  • Intentionally hire Latino/a faculty, staff and administrators 
  • Utilize Advanced Course of Study to offer one year of MDiv in Spanish  
  • Coordinate seminary efforts with The United Methodist Church 

2011-
2016

 Inter-cultural, world religions, and global Christianity preparation of students

  • Endow chair to continue faculty position beyond Luce Grant funding
  • Explore possibility of required course in global Christianity and world religions

2011-
2012

 Strengthen Vocational Formation and Church Leadership (VFCL) program

  • Hire new director, faculty member
  • Integrate faculty into program on a rotating basis
  • Continue assessment of track coordinator/small group organization
  • Address effective inclusion of basic church administration content within MA/MDiv

2011-
2016

 Strengthen and support online teaching/learning opportunities

  • See priorities under “Emerging Technologies” and “Outreach to Leaders and Communities”
  • Continue assessment of the use of these technologies in theological education

2011

 Faculty deployment

  • Update faculty deployment plan to support 320 FTE
  • Analyze workload and personnel requirements to support curricular commitments
  • Analyze adjunct/affiliate faculty use
  • Maintain student/faculty ratio between 12:1 and 13:1 

2012-
2016

 Faculty development

  • Enhance support with professional funding, study leave, competitive salary and benefits (ACTS schools and UM free-standing seminaries)
  • Continue support for pedagogical improvement and ongoing assessment of effective implementation of learning objectives

2011-
2012

 Curriculum review

  • Perform a course audit by field and program
  • Explore a new degree program with international focus
  • Explore and review MDiv concentrations 

2012

 Strengthen Library and Research Capacities

 See United Library Strategic Plan


STRATEGIC PRIORITY: STUDENT LIFE

YEAR

 NEW INITIATIVES

2011-
2013

 International Student Affairs

  • Hire a director of ISA
  • Develop a viable student and scholar exchange program

2011

 Community and Residence Emergencies

  • Clarify our current emergency preparedness plan
  • Socialize the plan–make it accessible, available and memorable
  • Assess security staffing needs

2011

 Office of Affirmative Action

  • Consult with EEO agency for training and certification

2012

 Spouse/Partner Support

  • Ensure family members feel hospitality through programs and activities that encourage family time, peer spouse support groups, and fun events for children

2012

 Eliza Garrett Project

  • Extend this one-day program to mini-projects occurring throughout the year to include: Habitat for Humanity, area homeless shelter support, night ministry with homeless youth, church and community meal programs

2012

 Volunteer Council

  • Collaborate through Student Council with students who wish to share their expertise to assist and respond to the needs of the community
  • Weekly Bible Study – led by doctoral volunteers
  • Yearly student retreat and revival
  • Workshops for the Fit to Lead program: financial, emotional/psychological and physical fitness
  • Ambassadors/sponsors to new students
  • International Student Partners

2012 -2013

 Dept of Disaster Resistance and Response

  • Hire security personnel
  • Establish crisis notification system (cell phone, email, etc)
  • Provide table top training with key personnel and area first responders
  • Have semester emergency evacuation drills

2012-
2015

 Center for Post-Seminary Career Discernment (CPCD) to help students and alums discern their ministry post-seminary and to offer them employment resources

  • Employment Café – dedicated location with computers loaded with employment software
  • Connectional Career Moodle Resource – with employment listings
  • Denominational Network–assisting denominational representatives meeting with students  and providing employment information occurring within various conferences, presbyteries, etc
  • Post-seminary career counseling (esp. for persons not entering parish ministry or desiring to serve as elders/pastors)

2011-
2014

 Institute for Inter-Cultural Awareness and Anti-Racism

  • Bring our culturally related Centers together for richer collaborative work
  • Analyze the seminary’s cultural and race sensitivity. Work to become an anti-racist institution.
  • Establish anti-racism training and inter-cultural awareness seminars/workshops beginning with the annual Fall orientation with the assistance of students
  • Missions and Interfaith Collaborations: Offering resources to connect students with Chicago-metro area interfaith organizations; providing UMVIM missions training opportunities; supporting cross-cultural missions experiences by connecting students with viable agencies and denominational programs


STRATEGIC PRIORITY: EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING

YEAR

2011-2012

 Complete processes and procedures

 New Learning Management System training and use

 Basic Graduate Theological Studies (BGTS) fully online

 Faculty and student manuals

 Legal and copyright issues

 Certifying faculty through University of Wisconsin certificate program

2012-2013

 Expand in response to opportunities

  Develop assessment process: New ATS Guidelines

 Respond to online MDiv developments in UMC

 Develop continuing education program

 Work with Institute for Transformative Leaders and Communities (ITLC) programs

 Work with COS online development

 Hold faculty professional development forum

 Use social media

2013-2014

 Consolidate gains, evaluate programs and revise

 Perform internal review of all practices, procedures

 Revise as indicated by review

 Hold faculty professional development forum

 Develop strategic plan for 2014-2016

2014-2016

 Oversee assessment-based program changes

Metrics for Emerging Technology

Faculty enrolled in University of Wisconsin Certificate Program in Online Teaching

 90% by December 2011

Online academic courses

 15 in academic year 2011/12

Enrollment in online courses

 HC: _____                 FTE: ______

Academic courses on the learning management system

 100% in academic year 2013/2014

First online continuing education courses

 2012/2013


STRATEGIC PRIORITY: OUTREACH TO LEADERS AND COMMUNITIES

YEAR

2011

 Create a Website for lifelong learners—laity and clergy

  • Online resources, databases
  • G-ETS lecture schedules
  • Available workshops—ours and others
  • Listing of where faculty will be speaking and topic
  • Articles 
  • Online Bible study resources 

2011

 Coordinate and expand not-for-credit academic and co-curricular programs

  • Clarify processes 
  • Engage faculty, staff and alumni in developing an array of subject offerings 
  • Employ diverse delivery options 
  • Promote widely 

2011-12

 Stream lectures held at Garrett-Evangelical

  • Create options for CEUs
  • Determine appropriate fees

2011

 Review policies and procedures to enhance Garrett-Evangelical hospitality

  • Prospective and current students
  • Orientation
  • Casual visitors
  • Student groups
  • Alumni

2011-13

 Expand Course of Study program

  • Strengthen on-campus program 
  • Add additional study sites 
  • Support development of Course of Study in Haiti and Southeast Asia 

2011-15

 Identify and twice a year report locations, settings and presentations by faculty, administrators, and staff

  • Presentations/programs/lectures/engagements for local churches, civic groups, districts, denominations, the general church and the greater community
  • Student engagement:  Eliza Garrett Day,  mission trips, community betterment days
  • Reporting to include: who, event, audience, number of participants, result

 G-ETS may use presentation locations to arrange parallel alumni and friends gatherings.

2012

 Expand local church-based classes for the community (Chicago Temple model)

  • In Chicagoland
  • Regional/cluster in “hinterland” 

2012-13

 Develop regional seminars responsive to needs and requests of areas

  • Consult with conferences; fliers/email to district superintendents, clergy and laity
  • This is not ITLC, but short-term focused extension education

2012-13

 Engage the G-ETS centers in developing programs/initiatives available to local churches and others

  • Online education
  • Ministries with “new members” of our community
  • History of ethnic groups
  • Political, cultural and social understandings and appreciation 

2012

 Provide “Oikos of God” consulting for congregations

  • Using the Eberhart model, develop a resource for local congregations and communities to assess the economic, social, political and theological issues of their community to strengthen and shape their ministries

2012/13

 Establish a two-week “Open University” summer think tank program


STRATEGIC PRIORITY: MANAGEMENT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND FINANCE

Fiscal Year

Every

 Audit-clean opinion; balanced budget; endowment draw 5%

2012

 Loder Hall reopens

 Lesemann Hall reopens

 Deferred maintenance plan #1 – Year 1 of 3

 Technology – Disaster recovery solution

 Corporate compliance review:

 Code of ethics

 Whistle-blower policy

 Sexual harassment training

2013

 GAAP financial reporting – from quarterly to monthly

 Deferred maintenance plan #1 – Year 2 of 3

 Install new phone system

 Rewrite employee handbooks

2014

 Deferred maintenance plan #1 – Year 3 of 3

 Long-term facilities plan

 Facilities plan implementation agreement with Northwestern U.

 Deferred maintenance plan #2

2015

 Auditor Grant Thornton – Retain or issue RFP

2016

 Corporate compliance review:

 Code of ethics

 Whistle-blower policy

 Sexual harassment training



[1] The seminary has successfully traversed a difficult economic recession.  We have managed to: 1) keep a remarkable faculty intact, 2) welcome the largest entering class in years for the fall of 2010, 3) start renovation of the student center, classrooms, library addition and Stead Center; and, 4) move ahead with sufficient financial resources to sustain the quality of our academic programs.

[2] Our goal is to have an FTE of 320 to 350 highly qualified students in residence on campus and to also offer online education to many audiences, including courses that might provide for up to 1/3 of the MDiv degree.   While the MDiv program remains a focal point, we also will continue to enthusiastically support our MA, MTS, DMin and PhD programs.  We will continue to provide Basic Graduate Theological Studies (BGTS) and other certificates for specialized ministry and will continue to seek the interconnectedness of these various emphases.

[3] There are several significant contemporary trends in the surrounding ecclesial and social ecology of theological education.  While the strength of Garrett-Evangelical allows us to choose alternative paths in recruitment, course requirements and instructional delivery, we do need to be mindful of the transitions occurring in the broader context.  One is reminded of the shift in degree nomenclature from the B.D. to the MDiv that occurred across theological education in the 1960s.  It appears there are even more dramatic shifts underway today.  Here are some of the emerging realities:

  1. A proposed reduction in the number of hours required to complete the MDiv degree;
  2. Increases in distance learning and other offerings promising non-residential education;
  3. A shrinking pool of students who are seeking ordination in mainline denominations;
  4. A growing focus on lay education and an emphasis on local pastors who receive alternative ministerial credentials to that of a seminary education.

UMC Logo Garrett-Evangelical, a seminary related to
The United Methodist Church, welcomes
students from a wide range of faith traditions.