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The Graduate Theological Conference

The 7th Graduate Theological Conference
Intersections of Resistance: Race, Sexuality, Gender, and Class

April 21, 2017 | Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

The Graduate Theological Conference was founded and is managed by students at Garrett-Evangelical. It aims to create a collegial atmosphere where graduate students of religion and graduate seminarians will have the opportunity to gain experience sharing their work with one another, collaborating, offering feedback, and networking with one another.

Please explore the sliders on this site to learn more about the conference and ways you can participate. Please contact Ms. Krista McNeil, administrator of academic affairs at 847.866.3903 or Dr. Andrew Wymer, Styberg postdoctoral teaching fellow, at 847.866.4548 with questions or concerns. 

Registration

There is no cost to attend the Graduate Theological Conference, but we do ask that you register so we have an accurate count for lunch. Please register by April 14, 2017!

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Schedule

 

9:00 a.m. Panel Discussion Featuring Dr. Stephen Ray, Dr. Trina Armstrong, and Dr. Nancy Bedford
Chapel of the Unnamed Faithful
10:00 a.m. Student Presentations
Various Classrooms
12:00 p.m. Lunch (provided for all registered attendees)
Room 205
1:00 p.m. Student Presentations
Various Classrooms
4:00 p.m. Keynote Speaker: Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey
When Nightmares Creep into Reality: Doing Justice-Work in an Era of "Alternative Facts"

Chapel of the Unnamed Faithful

Student Paper Presentations

"Hannah Arendt, Ashley Montagu, and the Seeds of Colorblind Racism"
By Chris Baker

"Black Obscene and Born to be Hurt"
By Dwayne Craig

"Transpacific Virtualities"
By Josiah Ewing

"Body as “Text”: A Dalit Reading of the Body"
By Jacob Godson

"Othering within la Familia"
By April Gutierrez

"Ahok: A Ghost Incarnate"
By Toar Hutagalung

"#BlackGirlMagic: An Emergent Tool of Resistance"
By Karen Mosby

"Embracing Nepantla: Embodying a World of Multiplicity & Learning to Love the Enemy Within"
By Elyssa Salinas,

"Paradigm of Shalom"
By Grant Swanson

"“Who Said I Ain’t God’s Son? Nigga Mama’ a virgin”: Tupac’s Cross as a Critique of the Euro-American Gaze towards the Black Body"
By Bryson White

"Being a Man: Masculinity and Domination Reflected in Exodus"
By Daniel Windham,

Keynote Lecture

When Nightmares Creep into Reality:
Doing Justice-Work in an Era of "Alternative Facts"

This lecture by Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey (G-ETS 2005) explores the possibilities scholars may take to address the pressing issues of justice across our nation. It problematizes the term scholar-activist and frames the necessary distinctions between socially constructed realities and the lived experiences of those realities which are critical to the emerging #Resistance movement.


 

About Rev. Dr. Pamela Lightsey

Pamela Lightsey is a scholar, social justice activist, and military veteran whose academic and research interests include: classical and contemporary just war theory, Womanist theology, Queer theory and theology, and African American religious history and theologies. Dr. Lightsey is an ordained elder in full connection in the United Methodist Church. She has served as Associate Pastor of a church in South Georgia, Senior Pastor of an urban church on the south side of Chicago, has done work for several UM general agencies and has strong connections within several mainline denominations.

As an activist, Dr. Lightsey has worked within the LGBTQ community to end Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell military policy and to ensure marriage equality, and she continues to critique churches for homophobic polity, liturgy and homiletics. Pamela was on the ground protesting against excessive police force during the first 21 days of unrest in Ferguson and was one of several livestreamers providing ongoing broadcasts across a one year period. Dr. Lightsey has consistently collaborated with activist-colleagues in the movement for the liberation of Black lives, those addressing violence against Black transwomen, and institutional racism on college campuses.

Currently serving as co-chair the American Academy of Religion’s Womanist Approaches to Religion and Society Group, Dr. Lightsey helps lead the work of the steering committee to develop their annual conference sessions dedicated to privileging the theological and ethical scholarship and experiences of Black women in America. She was among the first members of the Executive Committee for the Soul Repair Project, which studies the role of moral injury in veterans. The project is funded by several sources including a Lilly Endowment grant and is directed by feminist scholar, Dr. Rita Nakashima Brock. The story of her son Dweylon’s experience as an Iraq war veteran is included in Nakashima Brock and Lettini’s Soul Repair: Recovering From Moral Injury After War.

Pamela’s several publications include the full manuscript, Our Lives Matter: A Womanist Queer Theology (Wipf and Stock), “Reconciliation,” in Radical Evangelical (Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company), and “Is Necessary Violence a Just Violence?“ a review of Meagher’s "Killing From the Inside Out: Moral Injury and Just War" inSyndicate September/October 2015 (Cascade Books) and “If There Should Come a Word” in Black United Methodists Preach! (Abingdon Press).

 

The Graduate Theological Conference is very thankful for the ongoing support of the Center for the Church and the Black Experience and the Styberg Preaching Institute at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary. To learn more about these centers, please visit their websites by clicking on their logos. 

              


 

Call for Papers | CLOSED

Call for Papers

Intersections of Resistance: Race, Sexuality, Gender, and Class

The seventh graduate student conference at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary is seeking papers on the topic: Intersections of Resistance: Race, Sexuality, Gender, and Class, for a conference that will be held on April 21, 2017.

The theme provokes discourse to expose the numerous ways domination is experienced along lines of race, sexuality, gender, and class; invites an awareness of the interrelationship and connectivity among those experiencing domination; privileges the intersections and accompanying experiences of domination as the central location of theological discourse; and inspires holistic resistance to domination. “Domination” is inspired by Patricia Hill Collins' "matrix of domination," and "intersections" emerges out of Kimberle Crenshaw's notion of "intersectionality." Potential approaches to the topic might include (but are not limited to): 

  • What new perspectives are needed or are emerging on the intersections of race, sexuality, gender, and class?
  • In light of systemic domination, how might power be negotiated, resisted, and subverted?
  • How are sacred texts, symbols, and rituals utilized to connect or to disconnect persons who experience domination across different or multiple social locations, and how are these sacred texts, symbols, and rituals employed in the continuation of and/or resistance to systemic domination?

Submissions are encouraged from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives (biblical studies, church history, theology, ethics, and practical and pastoral ministry).

The Graduate Theological Conference was founded and is managed by students at Garrett-Evangelical. It aims to create a collegial atmosphere where graduate (master’s and doctoral) students of religion and graduate seminarians have the opportunity to gain experience sharing their work, collaborating, offering feedback, and networking with one another.

Paper submissions are due February 15, 2017. Papers should be no longer than 2500 words, double spaced, follow the writing style appropriate to the field/area (i.e, Turabian, APA, SBL), and include a bibliography. Papers should be accompanied by a 250 word abstract, stating the thesis and summarizing the paper. The abstract should include your name, email address, institutional affiliation, and degree program. 

Papers will be reviewed by the student editorial board. Invitations to present at the conference will be extended by March 1, 2017. Final papers are due March 31, 2017. Final papers will be reviewed by Garrett-Evangelical faculty members or students, who will offer a brief scholarly response.

Papers and abstracts should be sent to gtc@garrett.edu. Please contact Ms. Krista McNeil, administrator for academic affairs, at 847.866.3903 or Dr. Andrew Wymer, Styberg postdoctoral teaching fellow, at 847.866.4548 with questions or concerns.

Important Dates

Important Dates

February 15, 2017                      Papers and abstracts due

March 1, 2017                            Invitations to present at the conference will be sent

March 31, 2017                          Final papers due

April 21, 2017                             Day of the conference

Coordinators

Dr. Andrew Wymer, Styberg postdoctoral teaching fellow
Staff Co-Coordinator

Ms. Krista McNeil, administrator for academic affairs
Staff Co-Coordinator