Garrett-Evangelical News

Garrett on the Road

We're always on the road connecting with new people and their calls to ministry work of all kinds. Along the way, we would love to get to meet you too! Join us if we're in your area or contact us for a visit:


Festival of Young Preachers
Indianapolis, IN
1.2-5.2014

Seminary Caravan
Millsaps College
Jackson, MS
1.23.2014

Wiley College Ethical Student Leadership Conference
Marshall, TX
1.24.2014

Wiley College Gradute School Fair
Marshall, TX
1.25.2014

Oklahoma City University
Oklahoma City, OK
1.27.2014


Imagining Your Future:  A Vocation and Mission Fair
Emmanuel Community UMC
Menomonee Falls, WI
2.8.2014

The Justice Conference 2014:  Indianapolis
Indianapolis, IN
2.21-22.2014

Progressive Youth Ministry
Chicago, IL
3.19-21-2014

Black Methodists for Church Renewal
47th Annual Meeting
St. Louis, MO
3.28-29.2014

Seminary Fair (SPAN)
Orlando, FL
4.10.2014

What's Next:  United Methodist Student Movement
Denver, CO
11.7-9.2014

 

Garrett on the Move

On the Road


On the Road

Below is a list of the schools and ministry fairs Garrett-Evangelica is scheduled to visit. We'd love to talk at any one of these events about your call to ministry and how a seminary education from Garrett and prepare you for your future. Also, click the next tab to schedule a visit by us to your campus or event.



Request a Visit

Request a Visit
(a form will go here with necessary required information to schedule a visit to a school)

{tab =Alumni in Your Area}
Alumni in Your Area
Want to hear more about our seminary from a former students' perspective? Feel free to contact anyone of our alumni listed below about their experiences at Garrett-Evangelical.
(here will rest a table with the following columns:  name, location, degree, current role, email)

Going to Garrett

Once again, we want congratulate you on your admittance to Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary! We welcome you to the City of Evanston, the shores of Lake Michigan, and the campus of Northwestern University. You join a community that is over 160 years old and includes thousands of living alumni who are engaged in ministry across the country and throughout the world. Welcome! 

In an effort to support your transition to Garrett-Evangelical and graduate theological education, we offer this page as a collection of resources. We are pleased and privileged to welcome you to the community.

Orientation

For new students beginning this fall semester, Orientation will begin Tuesday evening, August 26 and go through Friday, August 29.  International Student Orientation will be Thursday, August 21. During the weeks leading up to Orientation, each Thursday we have been sending a GOING TO GARRETT email with pertinent information for new students. If you missed an email, you can access our past emails below:

Registration  Orienatation Pic - Square    Housing  Parking pic - Square   Business Office Pic - Square   Financial Aid pic - Square
Going to Garrett:
Registration & Orientation
  Going to Garrett:
Housing & Hospitality
Going to Garrett:
Business Office &
Student Accounts
  Going to Garrett:
Financial Aid
           
Academic Affairs  - Square   Student Life - Square   VFCL - Square    
Going to Garrett:
Academic Affairs
   Going to Garrett:
Student Life
Going to Garrett:
VFCL & Field Ed
   


If Orientation will be your first time on campus, please see our Directions and Maps page. 

Fall Orientation Schedule

Below are documents you will need to read and/or fill out and return before your arrival.  We will be updating this list throughout the summer.

Documents (Required) 
Office of Student Life Information
Immunization Form
Insurance Verification Form
Student Handbook Form
Policy on Sexual Harassment
Letter from Dean Rivera regarding the Whistling Vivaldi required reading for Orientation
Online tutorial on recognizing plagiarism by Indiana University (Bring a signed copy of the Certificate of completion to Orientation or send a pdf signed copy to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. )

Documents (Optional)
Companions on the Journey Request Form 
Counseling Request
Disability Accommodation Request

Supporting Documents
FERPA
Insurance Costs
Staff Pictorial Directory "Who do I see about..."
Student Council (StuCo) Pictorial Directory
Information about On-Campus Centers
Moving to Evanston Tips


 

 

Timetable

For Students Starting in Fall 2014:

June   
1 -  Registration Opens

August
1   - Preferred Apartment Move-in
15 - Preferred Apartment Move-in  
21 - International Student Orientation
22-24 - Apartment and Residence Hall Move-in
26-  New Student Orientation (Evening)
27 - New Student Orientation (Day 1)
28 - New Student Orientation (Day 2) 
29 - New Student Orientation (Day 3)

September
2  - Fall Semester Begins



Budgeting

Students considering federal student loans and aid must submit a FAFSA form.

Please use this Financial Aid Checklist to help you through the various steps in order to receive your federal financial aid monies.

Garrett-Evangelical's Institutional Code is: G01682.

Loans are disbursed after the second week of classes. 

Scholarships are disbursed the first week of classes.

Federal Work Study and on-campus job opportunities are posted on the MyGETS Office of Financial Aid page. Listings for Fall are usually posted after August 1. 

Please note: students must be registered at least part-time for any financial aid. 
(6-10 credit hours for Masters students, 2-5 credit hours for PhD students) 

 


Moving

Apartment and Residential Halls
Garrett-Evangelical offers a wide range of affordable, residential housing. Our apartments and residential halls are usually filled to capacity, and placement is on a first-come, first-served basis, so it is important to apply for housing early.

Housing forms are available here.

Preferred apartment move-in dates for the Fall:

  • August 1
  • August 15


Preferred residential hall move-in date:

  • Friday, August 22

Early move-in is possible upon availability.

Parking and Transporation
Parking is available through the seminary, Northwestern University, or the City of Evanston. The Housing Office has detailed information on parking options and prices.   

Due to our compact campus and excellent public transportation, students may not need a car. The Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) offers unlimited monthly passes for $86. 

Connecting


Going to Garrett
Seminary starts now! Connect with current students by signing up for Companions on the Journey, connect with your in class through Facebook, share your excitment on Twitter and share pictures on Tumblr.  

The Companions on the Journey at Garrett-Evangelical (CJG-ETS) Program is a formal organization of current Garrett students selected to serve as intentional peer support for admitted and incoming students. The CJG program participants help incoming students develop initial social and academic networks. Learn more / To participate 

twitter-transparent Just qualified, just deposited? Let us and others know! 
Tweet us @garrettseminary and use #g2gets                     
FB-Transparent - New Edit  Garrett-Evangelical Admissions is the official page for prospective and new
 students. Feel free to post, comment, share and like. 
icon tumblr Check out Garrett's Tumblr. If you have videos, pictures or reposts you'd like to share feel free to email us This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . 

 

 

Living

Evanston
The City of Evanston, home of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and Northwestern University, boasts over 70 municipal parks and over 5 miles of public Lake Michigan beach front.

Information on the local school districts, activities, museums, libraries, parking, shopping, and dining can all be found on the City of Evanston homepage. 

For students with young children, please consult The Early Childhood Guide Resources in Evanston guide.

Chicago 
Chicago is famously (maybe infamously) known as the Second City, but as our mayor Rahm Emmanuel recently said, "It's a world-class, first-class city, too." Students are encouraged to experience the city's many resources first-hand. 

Explore Chicago - Official Chicago Guide
Garrett Chicago Guide
 

 

 

History of Christianity and Historical Theology

 

The PhD in History of Christianity and Historical Theology primarily prepares persons for teaching in theological seminaries and undergraduate church-related colleges, as well as for denominational leadership, and productive scholarship. This Concentration focuses upon historical themes, issues, and methodologies.  Students in the program will study a major historical emphasis, such as Christian origins and the Early church; the Reformations in Europe; the rise of the Reformation and the Wesleyan movement in England;  the period of US Christian history; Wesleyan and Methodist Studies.  Within these, more delimited time periods and subjects/themes would be selected for study and research, to include social context, theological developments, and key ecclesiastical and social issues.  The program allows students to minor in another theological discipline, or earn the seminary’s certificate in African American Studies.

Admission

Admission Requirements:

  • Masters degree in religious or theological studies from an accredited college or university.
  • Proficiency in the English language. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to give evidence of such competence (demonstrated by a TOEFL score).

 A completed application consists of:

  • Application
  • Research statement
  • Professional experience/Resume
  • Writing sample (15 pages)
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy interrnal and federal requirements.

The admissions committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the Ph.D. program.

Graduation

PhD (H) Degree - 40 semester hours
 
H Degree Grid

  • 7 semester hours of core courses required of all PhD students
  • 24 semester hours in the major in Historical Studies
  • 9 hours in a minor field of study
  • At least two languages, ordinarily one from each of the following categories: 
    a) Latin, Greek, or Hebrew 
    b) French, German, or Spanish
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination
    Among the three written exams in historical studies.
  • Dissertation proposal
  • Dissertation

 

Courses


Courses in the Concentration:

  • Life in the Early Church
  • Life in the Medieval Church
  • Christology and Trinity in the Early Church
  • Christianity and Culture in the Roman Empire
  • Ecclesiastical Latin
  • Topics in the History of Christian Thought
  • African American Religious History
  • Religion and the American Way
  • The Tasks of History
  • Christian Social and Political Thought: Topics
  • War and Peace
  • City of God
  • Introduction to Global Christianity
 

Faculty



Core Program Faculty

Anna Johnson

Anna Marie Johnson

Assistant Professor of Reformation History

Select Bibliography
“Introduction for Martin Luther's Prefaces to the Postils of Antonius Corvinus,” in  American Edition of Luther's Works, volume 59.  Concordia (forthcoming.)

Entries on Anfechtung, Astrology, Gabriel Biel, Lucas Cranach, Diet of Worms, Desiderius Erasmus, Frederick the Wise, Humanism, Indulgences, Andreas Bodenstein von Karlstadt, Leipzig Disputation and Witchcraft in Companion to Reformation Theology, David Whitford, ed.,T&T Clark  (forthcoming).

Translation of “Martin Luther Reconsidered for 2017,” by Volker Leppin, in Lutheran Quarterly, Vol. 22 No. 4 (Winter 2008): 373-386.

Larry Murphy

Larry Murphy

Professor of the History of Christianity

Select Bibliography
Sojourner Truth: A Biography.  Greenwood Press, 2011.

“‘Good Religion’ and the Quest for Constructive Inter-Religious Dialogue,” in Kenneth L. Vaus and K.K. Yeo, eds., The Theology of Light and Sight:  An Interfaith Perspective.  Wipf  & Stock,  2011.

“Piety and Liberation: An Historical Exploration of African American Religion and Social Justice,” in Iva E. Carruthers, et.al., eds., Blow the Trumpet in Zion: Global Vision and Action for the 21st-Century Black Church.  Fortress Press, 2005.

African-American Faith in America. New York: Facts on File. 2003.

"W.E.B. DuBois and the Souls of Black Folk: A Commentary," in: AME Church Review, Vol.CXIX, April-June, 2003.

editor, Down by the Riverside: Readings in African American Religion. New York University Press, 2000.

Jim Papandrea

Jim Papandrea

Associate Professor of Church History

Select Bibliography
Reading the Early Church Fathers: From the Didache to Nicaea.  Paulist Press, 2012.

“Novatian” in Encyclopedia of Ancient History.  Wiley-Blackwell, 2012.

Novatian of Rome and the Culmination of Pre-Nicene Orthodoxy.  Pickwick Publications, Princeton Monograph Series, 2011.

The Wedding of the Lamb: A Historical Approach to the Book of Revelation.  Pickwick Publications, 2011.

“Between Two Thieves: Novatian of Rome and Kenosis Christology” in If These Stones Could Speak… Studies on Patristic Texts and Archaeology: Essays in Honor of Dennis E. Groh. The Edwin Mellen Press, 2009.

The Trinitarian Theology of Novatian of Rome: A Study in Third Century Orthodoxy.  The Edwin Mellen Press, 2008.

 
 
 

Affiliated Faculty from Cognate Disciplines

 

 Mark Teasdale

Mark Teasdale

E. Stanley Jones Assistant Professor of Evangelism


Select Bibliography
Articles “Saint Sava” and “Serbian Christianity,” in Blackwell Encyclopedia of Christian Civilization, 2008.

“Peter Cartwright and the Emerging National Identity in Antebellum America,” in Methodist History vol. 46, no. 2, Jan. 2008

Solicited Book Review on Gibbs, Eddie and Ryan K. Bolger, Emerging Churches: Creating Christian Community in Postmodern Cultures.  Baker Academic, 2005.Journal of the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education vol. 22, 2006 – 2007.

Solicited Book Review on Raschke, Carl, The Next Reformation: Why Evangelicals Must Embrace Postmodernity , in Journal of the Academy for Evangelism in Theological Education vol. 21, 2005 – 2006.

Barry Bryant copy

Barry Bryant

Associate Professor of Wesleyan and United Methodist Studies


Select Bibliography
"The Israeli-Palestinian Situation: Theological Explorations" and "Reflections of a Recovered Christian Zionist" Quarterly Review, Spring 2005

Presidential address, "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness: Conflict of Values?" Wesley Philosophical Society, March 2004

"Class Leaders, Pastoral Care, and Christian Formation," in Discipleship Quarterly 18 (2003) 3:6-7

"Trinity, Technology, and the Meaning of Personhood," in Memphis Theological Seminary Journal, 38(2002)1:5-17

Henk Pieterse

Hendrik Pieterse

Associate Professor of Global Christianity and World Religions


Select Bibliography
“Die Gastfreundschaft Gottes leben,” in Michael Nausner, ed., Kirchliches Leben in methodistische Tradition: Perspektiven aus drei Kontinenten. Reutlinger Theologische Studien Band 6.  Edition Ruprecht, 2009.Opting for the Margins, Again: Recovering an Episcopal Initiative.   General Board of Higher Education and Ministry, The United Methodist Church, 2007); also available online: http://www.gbhem.org/site/c.lsKSL3POLvF/b.3470795/k.A280/Publications.htm.

“In Search of a Nation: Nation Building in the New South Africa.” Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, Volume 8 (February 2002). Web: http://www.safundi.com.

“Neopragmatism and the Christian Desire for a Transcendent God: Is a Dialogue Possible?” Essays in Philosophy: A Biannual Journal, Volume 3, Number 2, 2002. Web: http://www.humboldt.edu/~essays.

“Rorty among the Theologians: The Possibility of Theology after the New Historicism.” Published in Charley D. Hardwick and Donald A. Crosby (eds.), Pragmatism, Neo-Pragmatism, and Religion: Conversations with Richard Rorty.  Peter Lang, 1997.

Open House Registration

Open House - March 15, 2014
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Mission in the Contemporary United States

The local congregation in the United States today is better understood as a mission outpost than as a "neighborhood church." The Garrett-Evangelical Mission in the Contemporary United States track understands this, and offers students the ability to analyze the culture and the church like a missionary so that they can effectively lead their congregations in engaging the people around them. Courses will vary from sociology of American religion to theology of evangelism. More than just theoretical, students will evaluate case studies from local congregations to consider what the best practices of mission-based ministry would be in specific situations.

Please note that this track is offered on alternating years. The program will next accept applicants for the January 2013-2014 academic term.   

Admissions

Admissions Requirements:

  • Applicants must have earned a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree or its equivalent.

    Most master's degrees that are not MDivs require at least some additional theology courses for students to meet MDiv equivalency. Please feel free to contact the Registrar's Office to have your transcript evaluated for equivalency.
  • Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time ministry following the awarding of that degree.

    Applicants do not, however, have to be ordained nor does the ministry have to be in a parish setting.
  • Applicants must be serving in a ministry setting in which the applicant could direct a ministry intervention as part of the final DMin project.

    It is important that applicants have both the access to and support of a ministry setting in which they can complete their final project. This setting could be a parish church, a cluster of local congregations, an annual conference or judicatory, or any other setting appropriate to the practice of ministry being studied by the applicant.

International Student Applicants

The DMin Program offers coursework in intensive sessions twice a year. This schedule has implications for international students and visa applications. Therefore, we are unable to offer F-1 visas for Doctor of Ministy students.

A completed application consists of:

  • Application Form
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Biographical Essay
  • Sample of Writing
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Ministry site Endorsement Letter
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy internal and federal requirements.

Detailed information for the application requirements can be found on the online application.

The Doctor of Ministry committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the DMin program.

Graduation

DMin Degree - 30 semester hours
DMin Degree Grid

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

  • "World Evangelism"
  • "Evangelism, Church Growth, and Ecclesiology"
  • "Stewardship and Institutional Development"
  • "Reading the Culture"
  • "Leadership for Pastor and Laity"

Schedule

The program is offered primarily in January and summer two-week intensives, with course preparation before and after course completion.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:
Fall - Submit application by 1 October, notified of admission by 1 November
January - Attend two courses
Summer - Attend two courses

Year 2:
January - Attend two courses
Summer - Attend two courses and begin work on mid-program material

Year 3:
Fall - Submit mid-program material for approval and begin ministry intervention
January - Complete ministry intervention and begin writing final ministry project paper
Spring - Complete and defend final ministry project paper

Spiritual Direction

 

The Spiritual Direction track offers students an opportunity to enhance their ability to guide Christians in their understanding and practices of relating to God. In it, students learn the classical spiritual disciplines, study their historical applications, and consider how to apply these disciplines in a multitude of ways in their own congregations. Students also learn how to ground the spiritual disciplines in the mission of redemption, reconciliation and healing that God gave to the church, how to use spiritual disciplines to strengthen their leadership in the congregation, and how to bring spiritual formation to bear in issuesof pastoral care, worship and administration. At the end of the degree, graduates will be equipped to serve as spiritual directors for individuals and small groups.

The conversations in classes are greatly enriched by ecumenical and ethinical diversity. The program provides a rich background as well as supervision experience in spiritual direction. The research project will also be directed in the area of spiritual formation/direction.

Please note that this track is offered on alternating years. The program will next accept applicants for the January 2014-15 academic term.  

Admissions

Admissions Requirements:

  • Applicants must have earned a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree or its equivalent.

    Most master's degrees that are not MDivs require at least some additional theology courses for students to meet MDiv equivalency. Please feel free to contact the Registrar's Office to have your transcript evaluated for equivalency.
  • Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time ministry following the awarding of that degree.

    Applicants do not, however, have to be ordained nor does the ministry have to be in a parish setting.
  • Applicants must be serving in a ministry setting in which the applicant could direct a ministry intervention as part of the final DMin project.

    It is important that applicants have both the access to and support of a ministry setting in which they can complete their final project. This setting could be a parish church, a cluster of local congregations, an annual conference or judicatory, or any other setting appropriate to the practice of ministry being studied by the applicant.

International Student Applicants

The DMin Program offers coursework in intensive sessions twice a year. This schedule has implications for international students and visa applications. Therefore, we are unable to offer F-1 visas for Doctor of Ministy students.

A completed application consists of:

  • Application Form
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Biographical Essay
  • Sample of Writing
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Ministry site Endorsement Letter
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy internal and federal requirements.

Detailed information for the application requirements can be found on the online application.

The Doctor of Ministry committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the DMin program.

Graduation

DMin Degree - 30 semester hours
DMin Degree Grid

The distinctic curriculum for the Spiritual Direction track consists of the following courses:

  • Spiritual Disciplines for Leadership
  • Spiritual Direction in Multi-cultural/Multi-religious World
  • Mission and Theology of the New Testament
  • Supervision in Spiritual Direction
  • Spiritual Direction and Pastoral Care

Schedule

The program is offered primarily in January and summer two-week intensives, with course preparation before and after course completion.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:
Fall - Submit application by 1 October, notified of admission by 1 November
January - Attend two courses
Summer - Attend two courses

Year 2:
January - Attend two courses
Summer - Attend two courses and begin work on mid-program material

Year 3:
Fall - Submit mid-program material for approval and begin ministry intervention
January - Complete ministry intervention and begin writing final ministry project paper
Spring - Complete and defend final ministry project paper

African-American Congregational Leadership

The Garrett-Evangelical African-American Congregational Leadership track recognizes the distinctive history and culture of the African-American Church and offers students an opportunity to enhance their capacity to engage effectively in ministry within this context. For this reason, students admitted into this track must be engaged in ministry that is significant to African-Americans or the African-American context.

Students will address issues such as how to approach biblical studies, theological reflection, church administration, and evangelism from an African-American perspective. The courses are taught by one of the largest cohort of African-American faculty at a United Methodist seminary. The program compliments the faculty with a cadre of highly accomplished African-American alums of Garrett-Evangelical, including Rev. Dr. Carlisle Fielding Stewart and Bishop Beverly Shamana.

Admission

Admissions Requirements:

  • Applicants must have earned a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree or its equivalent.

    Most master's degrees that are not MDivs require at least some additional theology courses for students to meet MDiv equivalency. Please feel free to contact the Registrar's Office to have your transcript evaluated for equivalency.
  • Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time ministry following the awarding of that degree.

    Applicants do not, however, have to be ordained nor does the ministry have to be in a parish setting.
  • Applicants must be serving in a ministry setting in which the applicant could direct a ministry intervention as part of the final DMin project.

    It is important that applicants have both the access to and support of a ministry setting in which they can complete their final project. This setting could be a parish church, a cluster of local congregations, an annual conference or judicatory, or any other setting appropriate to the practice of ministry being studied by the applicant.

International Student Applicants

The DMin Program offers coursework in intensive sessions twice a year. This schedule has implications for international students and visa applications. Therefore, we are unable to offer F-1 visas for Doctor of Ministy students.

A completed application consists of:

  • Application Form
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Biographical Essay
  • Sample of Writing
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Ministry site Endorsement Letter
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy internal and federal requirements.

Detailed information for the application requirements can be found on the online application.

The Doctor of Ministry committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the DMin program.

Graduation

DMin Degree - 30 semester hours
DMin Degree Grid

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"African-American Church Administration and Congregational Development"
"Biblical Hermeneutics in the African-American Context"
"Black Ministry Engaging Historical Challenges"

Schedule

Students in the African American Congregational Leadership track will attend two different types of sessions in the program.

In January and late-June students will attend two-week intensive terms during which they will take two courses. These courses will cover topics related specifically to church leadership, such as stewardship and renewal, as well as providing fundamental research skills for deepening the student's academic facility and helping the student better analyze the local congregation.

In mid-Fall and mid-Spring students will participate in three-day seminars led by Garrett-Evangelical faculty, covering the latest in management and leadership studies. Each session will conclude with a discussion led by the Garrett-Evangelical faculty member who will facilitate the students' theological reflection on the content from the seminar.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:
Fall: Apply to program by 1 October, notified of acceptance by 1 November
January: Complete two courses
Summer: Complete two courses

Year 2:
Fall: Attend Seminar
January: Complete two courses
Spring: Attend Seminar
Summer: Begin working on mid-program material

Year 3:
Fall: Attend Seminar
January: Continue working on mid-program material
Spring: Attend Seminar, Submit mid-program material for approval
Summer: Begin ministry intervention

Year 4:
Fall: Complete ministry intervention and begin writing final ministry project paper
Spring: Complete and defend final ministry project paper, Graduate

Courses

List of Possible Courses

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"Biblical Hermeneutics in the African-American Context"
"African-American Church Administration and Congregational Development"

Congregational Leadership

Recognizing the complex demands placed on pastoral leaders to serve as heralds of the gospel, teachers of the Christian heritage, chief administrative officers of the church, long-range planners, budget directors, program innovators and implementers, and personnel managers, the Congregational Leadership track offers the best possible mix of practical management training and theological education to enhance a pastor's ability to be a more effective leader. Students in this track will develop the necessary skills to understand their own leadership styles, recognize how to best lead in their local congregations, and prepare their congregations to be change agents in their respective contexts.

Admissions

Admissions Requirements:

  • Applicants must have earned a Master of Divinity (MDiv) degree or its equivalent.

    Most master's degrees that are not MDivs require at least some additional theology courses for students to meet MDiv equivalency. Please feel free to contact the Registrar's Office to have your transcript evaluated for equivalency.
  • Applicants must have completed at least three years of full-time ministry following the awarding of that degree.

    Applicants do not, however, have to be ordained nor does the ministry have to be in a parish setting.
  • Applicants must be serving in a ministry setting in which the applicant could direct a ministry intervention as part of the final DMin project.

    It is important that applicants have both the access to and support of a ministry setting in which they can complete their final project. This setting could be a parish church, a cluster of local congregations, an annual conference or judicatory, or any other setting appropriate to the practice of ministry being studied by the applicant.

International Student Applicants

The DMin Program offers coursework in intensive sessions twice a year. This schedule has implications for international students and visa applications. Therefore, we are unable to offer F-1 visas for Doctor of Ministy students. 

A completed application consists of:

  • Application Form
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Biographical Essay
  • Sample of Writing
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Ministry site Endorsement Letter
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy internal and federal requirements.

Detailed information for the application requirements can be found on the online application.

The Doctor of Ministry committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the DMin program.

Graduation

DMin Degree - 30 semester hours
DMin Degree Grid

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"Administration and Leadership"
"Leadership for Pastor and Laity"
"Spiritual Disciplines for Leadership"
"Stewardship and Institutional Development"

Schedule

Students in the Congregational Leadership track will attend two different types of sessions in the program.

In January and late-June students will attend two-week intensive terms during which they will take two courses. These courses will cover topics related specifically to church leadership, such as stewardship and renewal, as well as providing fundamental research skills for deepening the student's academic facility and helping the student better analyze the local congregation.

In mid-Fall and mid-Spring students will participate in three-day seminars led by Garrett-Evangelical faculty, covering the latest in management and leadership studies. Each session will conclude with a discussion led by the Garrett-Evangelical faculty member who will facilitate the students' theological reflection on the content from the seminar.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:
Fall: Apply to program by 1 October, notified of acceptance by 1 November
January: Complete two courses
Summer: Complete two courses

Year 2:
Fall: Attend Seminar
January: Complete two courses
Spring: Attend Seminar
Summer: Begin working on mid-program material

Year 3:
Fall: Attend Seminar
January: Continue working on mid-program material
Spring: Attend Seminar, Submit mid-program material for approval
Summer: Begin ministry intervention

Year 4:
Fall: Complete ministry intervention and begin writing final ministry project paper
Spring: Complete and defend final ministry project paper, Graduate

Apply for Admission

 
To help conserve natural resources, Garrett-Evangelical publishes only an online application.  Please click on the degree or program you are applying to in order to begin your application.
 
 
PROFESSIONAL DEGREES
Master of Divinity                                                                            
Master of Arts in Pastoral Care and Counseling
Master of Arts in Music Ministry                                                
Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation and Evangelism
 
ACADEMIC DEGREES
Master of Theological Studies                                                   
Doctor of Philosophy


UNITED METHODIST PROGRAMS
Advanced Course of Study    

Advanced Course of Study (in Spanish)                                                     
BGTS/Deacon Studies                    
Certification
 

NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS
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Biblical Studies

 

The PhD in Biblical Studies (BS) prepares persons for teaching in colleges and international theological institutions, for scholarship, and for denominational leadership.  Students develop a major in either Old Testament or New Testament and a minor in the other testament or another area of the theological curriculum, e.g,  theology, ethics, church history (Roman era), to name a few.  Students are prepared with a comprehensive understanding of the theological, cultural, hermeneutical and exegetical issues facing contemporary biblical study.  In addition, as other students in the Garrett-Evangelical PhD program, students are equipped to address the inter-disciplinary issues in theological study.

Admission

Admission Requirements:

    • Masters degree in religious or theological studies from an accredited college or university.
    • Basic knowledge of Hebrew and Greek (one-year each)
    • MTS or MDiv that includes at least 4 biblical studies courses
    • Proficiency in the English language. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to give evidence of such competence (demonstrated by a TOEFL score).

A completed application consists of:

  • Application
  • Research statement
  • Professional experience/Resume
  • Writing sample (15 pages)
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy interrnal and federal requirements.

The admissions committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the Ph.D. program.

Graduation

PhD (BS) Degree - 40 semester hours
BS Degree Grid

  • 7 semester hours of core courses required for all Ph.D. students
  • 9 semester hours in core biblical studies courses  
  • 9-12 semester hours for a major in OT or NT
  • 6-9 semester hours for a minor in the other testament or area
  • 6- 9 semester hours in electives (determined with advisor)
  • 3 languages: Hebrew, Greek, and a modern language to enhance international and interdisciplinary study of biblical research and scholarship.
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination covering the following areas:
    (1) Major area
    (2) Minor area
    (3) Focused area of research
    (4)Open – to be determined with adviser
  • Dissertation prospectus to be discussed and approved at the time of the oral examination or within three months following the satisfactory completion of oral exam, as negotiated with advisor.
  • Dissertation

Faculty

Faculty:

Present faculty members in biblical studies have focused research on cultural, literary, and historical approaches to biblical study, the ethics of biblical research, and the impact of biblical studies in global Christianity.  Key faculty assisting with the program include:

 Cheryl Anderson

Cheryl Anderson

Professor of Old Testament


Select Bibliography
Ancient Laws and Contemporary Controversies: The Need for Inclusive Biblical Interpretation. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.Cheryl Anderson.  

Women, Ideology, and Violence: Critical Theory and the Construction of Gender in the Book of the Covenant and the Deuteronomic Law.  London: T&T Clark, 2004.

"Reflections in an Interethnic/racial Era on Interethnic/racial Marriage in Ezra.”  In They Were All Together in One Place: Toward Minority Biblical Criticism.  Edited by Randall C. Bailey, Tat-siong Benny Liew, and Fernando F. Segovia.  Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2009.

"The Eighth Commandment: A Way to King's 'Beloved Community'?”  In The Ten Commandments: The Reciprocity of Faithfulness.  Edited by William P. Brown.  Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2004.

 Charles Cosgrove

Charles Cosgrove

Professor of Early Christian Literature


Select Bibliography
An Ancient Christian Hymn with Musical Notation: Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1786: Text and Commentary (Morhr Siebeck, 2011).

In Other Words: Incarnational Translation for Preaching. With W. Dow Edgerton. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2007.

Cross-Cultural Paul: Journeys to Others, Journeys to Ourselves. With Herold Weiss and K. K. Yeo. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2005.

The Meanings We Choose: Hermeneutical Ethics, Indeterminacy and the Conflict of Interpretations. Editor and contributor. London and New York: T. & T. Clark International (Continuum), 2004.

Appealing to Scripture in Moral Debate: Five Hermeneutical Rules. Grand Rapids: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2002.

Elusive Israel: The Puzzle of Election in Romans. Nashville: Westminster John Knox, 1997.

 Julie Duncan

Julie Duncan

Associate Professor of Old Testament


Select Bibliography
"Book of Deuteronomy." In The Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Edited by Lawrence H. Schiffman and James C. VanderKam.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

"Excerpted Texts of Deuteronomy at Qumran." Revue de Qumran 18/69, 1996.

“4QDeuteronomy b, e, h, j, k1, k2, k3, l, m.” Discoveries in the Judean Desert XIV.Oxford: Clarendon, 1995.   

“New Readings for the ‘Blessing of Moses’ from Qumran.” Journal of Biblical Literature 114/2 (1995): 273-290.

“Considerations of 4QDeutj in Light of the ‘All Souls Deuteronomy’ and Cave 4 Phylactery Texts.” Proceedings of the International Congress on the Dead Sea ScrollsMadrid, 18-21 March 1991, eds. J. Trebolle Barrera and L. Vegas Montaner, 199-215.  Leiden: Brill, 1992.

 Brooke Lester

G. Brooke Lester

Assistant Professor of Hebrew Scripture


Select Bibliography
“Admiring Our Savvy Ancestors: Abraham's and Jacob's Rhetoric of Negotiation”Koinonia XV (2003): 81-94.

“Hebrew Bible and Higher Education.” http://anumma.com/" href="http://anumma.com/" data-mce-href="http://anumma.com/">http://anumma.com.

(With Jennifer S. Green and Joseph F. Scrivner)  Handbook to a Grammar for Biblical Hebrew. Rev. ed. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2005.

Jim Papandrea

Jim Papandrea

Associate Professor of Church History


Select Bibliography
The Wedding of the Lamb: A Historical Approach to the Book of Revelation. Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2010.

At Home with the Word. Scripture Commentary Contributor, 2011 Lectionary Year Edition.  Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 2010.

Pray (Not Just Say) The Lord’s Prayer. Liguori, MO: Liguori Publications, 2009.

 Osvaldo Vena copy

Osvaldo Vena

Professor of New Testament Interpretation


Select Bibliography
The Parousia and Its Rereadings. The Development of the Eschatological Consciousness in the Writings of the New Testament. Studies in Biblical Literature  Vol. 27. New York, NY: Peter Lang, 2001.Osvaldo Vena.  Apocalipsis (Revelation). Justo L. González, general editor. Series “Conozca su Biblia.” Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2008.

Evangelio de Marcos. Series “Comentarios para exégesis y traducción.” Edesio Sánchez and Esteban Voth editors. Miami, Florida: Sociedades Bíblicas Unidas, 2008.

“The Markan Construction of Jesus as Disciple of the Kingdom.”  In Mark: Texts @ Context Series.  Edited by Teresa Okure, Daniel M. Patte and Nicole Wilkinson Duran.  Fortress Press, 2010.

 KK 2

K.K. Yeo

Harry R. Kendall Professor of New Testament


Select Bibliography
Musing with Confucius and Paul. Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2008.

(Editor) Navigating Romans through Cultures.  Edinburgh: Continuum, 2004.

Biblical Rhetoric. (in Chinese) Beijing: Religious Culture Press, 2007.

 

Liturgical Studies

The PhD in Liturgical Studies (LS) program is designed for persons who seek advanced studies in Christian worship.   It enables students to become practical liturgical theologians who contribute to the ongoing reform and renewal of Christian worship.

The program seeks to provide a strong foundation through historical, theological, and pastoral study, including multi-cultural and interdisciplinary perspectives, so that those who complete this degree will be prepared to contribute significantly to the study and practice of Christian worship as college and seminary professors and as leaders in the Church.

Admission

Admission Requirements:

    • Masters degree in religious or theological studies from an accredited college or university.
    • Proficiency in the English language. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to give evidence of such competence (demonstrated by a TOEFL score).

A completed application consists of:

  • Application
  • Research statement
  • Professional experience/Resume
  • Writing sample (15 pages)
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy interrnal and federal requirements.

The admissions committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the Ph.D. program.

Graduation

PhD (LS) Degree - 40 semester hours
LS Degree Grid

  • 7 semester hours of core courses required of all PhD students
  • 24 semester hours in the major in Liturgical Studies
  • 9 hours in a minor field of study
  • At least two languages, ordinarily one from each of the following categories: 
    a) Latin, Greek, or Hebrew 
    b) French, German, or Spanish
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination
    Among the three written exams in liturgical studies, there is at least one question on each of the following areas of study: History of Worship, Ritual Studies, Sacramental Theology, Eucharist, Baptism, Liturgical Theology.
  • Dissertation proposal
  • Dissertation

 

Program Goals


Program Goals:

In the Ph.D. program in Liturgical Studies at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary, graduates will come to know in some breadth the history of Christian worship in its diverse theological and cultural settings. They will know in some depth the historical and theological development of the Christian practices of baptism and eucharist, as well as knowing in some depth the history and theology of liturgical practices in one's tradition and/or denomination.

In the course of the program, students will develop analytical tools and skills to evaluate and interpret Christian worship not only as it exists in official texts but especially in the practice of churches (in their ecumenical and cultural diversity), with particular attention to the contributions of practical theology, ritual studies, ethnography and congregational studies, and hermeneutics. They will engage in critical and constructive theological reflection on the churches' liturgical traditions and practices. They will prepare to participate in development, revision, and creative development of liturgical resources (liturgical texts, Christian education models, etc.) and worship services. They will prepare to encourage the church's critical and constructive reflection on its liturgical practices through teaching in the academy and the church.

Courses


Courses in the Concentration:

  • Worship and the Arts
  • Sacramental Theology
  • History of Christian Worship
  • Liturgies of Anointing & Reconciliation
  • Seminar in Liturgical Theology
  • Finding Words for Worship
  • Baptism and Reaffirmation
  • Eucharist
  • Cross Cultural Seminar in worship (immersion course)
  • History and Theology of Hymnody
  • Teaching Preaching
  • Seminar in Ritual Studies

Faculty


Ron Anderson 

E. Byron (Ron) Anderson

Styberg Associate Professor of Worship


Select Bibliography
Taught by God: Teaching and Christian Spiritual Formation, Chalice, 2007.

Worship and Christian Identity, Liturgical Press, 2003.

Liturgy and the Moral Self, Liturgical Press, 1998.

 Gennifer Brooks

Gennifer Brooks

Ernest and Bernice Styberg Associate Professor of Preaching

Select Bibliography
“Preaching” in Oxford Handbook of Methodist Studies, William J. Abraham and James E. Kirby, editors. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Praise the Lord, Lima, Ohio: C.S.S. Publications, 1996.

Good News Preaching, forthcoming from Pilgrim Press, 2009

 Ruth Duck

Ruth C. Duck

Professor of Worship


Select Bibliography
Worship for the Whole People of God (to be published by Westminster Knox, forthcoming).

Praising God: The Trinity in Christian Worship, Westminster Knox, 1999.

Welcome God's Tomorrow, (hymn text collection), G.I.A., 2005.

Finding Words for Worship, Westminster Knox, 1995.

 David Hogue

David A. Hogue

Professor of Pastoral Theology and Counseling (Ritual Studies) 


Select Bibliography
Remembering the Future, Imagining the Past: Story, Ritual, and the Human Brain,Cleveland, OH: Pilgrim Press, 2003.

Promising Again, with Herbert Anderson and Marie McCarthy, Westminster John Knox Press, 1996.


 

Graduates

Recent Graduates:

Tércio Junker (Brazil), 2003. Dissertation: "The Prophetic Dimension of Liturgy: Transforming Liturgy Seeking Social-Economic Justice." Assistant Professor of Worship and Director of Sweeney Chapel, Christian Theological Seminary, 2006-present.

Marlea Gilbert, 2006. Dissertation: "Incorporating a Rising Generation: A Study of Worship." Interim pastor, Burlington, Iowa.

Christopher Grundy 2006. Dissertation: "God's Resilient Table: Male Violence Against Women and the Embodied Logic of Holy Communion." Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship, Eden Theological Seminary. www.christophergrundy.com (music website)

Eric Myers, 2006. Dissertation: "The Place of the Eucharist in the Revised Funeral Rites of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)."  Pastor, Frederick Presbyterian Church (Frederick, MD);  Adjunct faculty at Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, DC; Member, Presbyterian Church, U.S.A., Hymnal Project Committee 2008.  Graduates Gilbert, Grundy, and Myers, and candidate Stephanie Perdew published The Work of the People: What We Do in Worship and Why (Herndon: Alban Institute, 2007).

Christian Education & Congregational Studies

The PhD in Christian Education and Congregational Studies (CE) primarily prepares persons for teaching in theological seminaries and undergraduate church-related colleges as well as denominational leadership in education. Students learnhow Christian faith is formed and embodied in communities of faith through the integration of insights from theology and the social sciences (psychology, education, sociology, anthropology). Two key emphases are (1) the traditions and practices of Christian religious education in congregations and public life that empower persons for faithful living, and (2) formation of youth in church and culture. Our interdisciplinary emphasis equips students to engage several fields in their research projects such as congregational studies, multi-cultural education, human development, qualitative research, history, and theology.

Admission

Admission Requirements:

    • Masters degree in religious or theological studies from an accredited college or university.
    • Proficiency in the English language. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to give evidence of such competence (demonstrated by a TOEFL score).

A completed application consists of:

  • Application
  • Research statement
  • Professional experience/Resume
  • Writing sample (15 pages)
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy interrnal and federal requirements.

The admissions committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the Ph.D. program.

Graduation

PhD (CE) Degree - 40 semester hours
CE Degree Grid

  • 7 semester hours of core courses required for all PhD students
  • 18-24 semester hours of Christian education and related disciplines
  • 9-12 semester hours in a cognate concentration
  • 2 research tools: one in a language for academic research and another in qualitative research or congregational studies (social science research tools require satisfactory completion of two graduate-level courses). Students may present competence in two languages as long as they also include congregational research in coursework.
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination covering the following areas: 
    (1) Overview of religious education 
    (2) Congregational studies 
    (3) Cognate area (church history, ethics, biblical studies, or theology) 
    (4) Focused area of research (e.g., transformative teaching and learning, etc.)
  • Dissertation prospectus to be discussed and approved at the time of the oral examination or within three months following the satisfactory completion of oral exam, as negotiated with advisor.
  • Dissertation

Program Goals

Knowing:
To know practices and disciplines of Christian education and formation and to understand how these are affected by differing cultural contexts. This goal includes the following sub-themes:

  • To know major approaches to faithful teaching and learning,
  • To understand learning theories - particularly liberative and transformative learning and multiple intelligences theory - and their pedagogical use,
  • To be aware of theories of human development including psycho-social, socio-cultural and faith development,
  • To know learning theories and how to use them,
  • To know the dynamics of congregational analysis,
  • To know the methods of qualitative, historical, and practical theological research,
  • To understand the practices and dynamics of university and seminary education,
  • To explore the dynamics of interfaith religious education.

Doing:
To conduct research in educational ministry and to prepare for teaching and leadership in a seminary, college, and/or the church.

  • To integrate practices of biblical and theological study into Christian religious education,
  • To be able to read, evaluate and engage the culture of a congregation and its community with particular sensitivity to culture, race, class and gender,
  • To teach a class in Christian education,
  • To demonstrate abilities to consult with others in educational ministry,
  • To complete a major research project using qualitative, historical or practical theological research.

Being:
To become a Christian educator/ practical theologian who seeks to liberate and empower persons to be co-creators of the reign of God in our multi-cultural and multi-faith environment. This goal includes the following:

  • To be a reflective teacher and leader who can empower others in a congregation or educational institution to be reflective and open to transformation,
  • To be a Christian disciple who continues to engage in the practices that develop and deepen faith,
  • To understand oneself as a critical and open participant in the ongoing practices of an academic discipline and theological tradition.

In addition to addressing these goals, students have ample opportunity for developing skills as teachers and scholars through serving as teaching assistants and developing a teaching portfolio. Each student develops a focus for research. Projects of previous graduates have included the following:

• Youth ministry in the African American church,
• Theological and vocational understandings of laity, 
• Theological education in Puerto Rico,
• Children and Eucharist,
• Theological development of adolescent girls,
• Spiritual formation in theological education,
• Pastoral leadership in urban African American congregations,
• Ministries with second generation Korean American young adults,
• Narrative and identity formation in the life stories of immigrant women.


Courses

Select Courses in this concentration:

 

• Seminar in Christian Education (offered each year. Topics include theology and education, emancipatory pedagogy, ethnicity and cultural pluralism, education for social change, and theological education)

• Youth, Culture, and Church 
• Adults and Christian Faith 
• Advanced Practicum in Teaching and Learning 
• Christian Education in the African American Experience 
• Curriculum and Resources in Educational Ministry 
• History and Theories of Christian Education
• Faith and Developmental Theories 
• Methods in Congregational Research 
• Seminar in Practical Theology 

 


Faculty

The present faculty members in Christian religious education have focused their research on the history and theology of education, on congregational studies and qualitative research, on practical theology, on youth ministry, and on adult education. Some professional contributions include the following:

Reggie Blount

Reginald Blount

Assistant Professor of Youth, Formation, and Culture

Virginia Lee

Virginia Lee

Associate Professor of Christian Education and Director of Deacon Studies


Select Bibliography
Study book to accompany the first book, Dust and Breath: A Christian Perspective on Faith and Health, by Kendra G. Hotz and Matthew T. Mathews, in a new series for the Church Health Center, 2011-2012.

“Becoming Multi-culturally Competent,” Christians in Education, Spring 2010.

“Piety: Affirmation of Tenure Message,” Memphis Theological Seminary Journal, Vol. 23, 2007.

“Guide Us, O God,” That We May Be Saved: Advent -- Lent Devotional Book 2002—2003, Division of Spiritual Formation, Board of Discipleship, Virginia Conference, 2002.

“The Pastor as Educator,” Alert Magazine, Fall 2000.

"The Hidden Curriculum: Is Your Church Teaching What It Intends To Teach?" Circuit Rider, March-April 2000.

Jack Seymour copy

Jack Seymour

Professor of Religious Education


Select Bibliography
“Characteristics of Religious Education.” Religious Education 107 (October‐December 2012) – in press.

“Theology, Education, and Social Science.” Religious Education 107 (July‐September, 2012): 321‐ 322.

“Building Consensus and Negotiating Conflict.” C(H)AOS Theory: Reflections of Chief Academic Officers in Theological Education. Ed. by Kadi Billman and Bruce Birch. Eerdmans, 2011: 268‐279.

Yearning for God: Reflections of Faithful Lives. With Margaret Ann Crain. Nashville: Upper Room Press, 2003.

A Deacon’s Heart: The New United Methodist Diaconate. With Margaret Ann Crain. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2001.

Mapping Christian Education: Approaches to Congregational Learning. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1997.

 

Graduates

Select Recent Book Publications of Program Graduates:
(Graduates identified in bold italics)

Baker, Dori Grinenko. Doing Girlfriend Theology: God-Talk with Young Women. Pilgrim Press, 2005.

Baker, Dori Grinenko & Mercer, Joyce Ann. Lives to Offer: Accompanying Youth on Their Vocational Quests. Pilgrim Press, 2007.

Caldwell, Elizabeth. Making a Home for Faith: Nurturing the Spiritual Life of Your Children.United Church Press, 2000.

Caldwell, Elizabeth. Leaving Home with Faith: Nurturing the Spiritual Life of Our Youth.Pilgrim Press, 2002.

Kang, S. Steve. Unveiling the Socioculturally Constructed Multivoiced Self: Themes of Self Construction and Self Integration in the Narratives of Second-Generation Korean American Young Adults. University Press, 2003.

Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth; Kang, S. Steve; Parrett, Gary. A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation. Baker Academic Books, 2004.

Parker, Evelyn. Trouble Don't Last Always: Emancipatory Hope among African American Adolescents. Pilgrim Press, 2003.

Wimberly, Anne Streaty & Parker, Evelyn. In Search of Wisdom: Faith Formation in the Black Church. Abingdon Press, 2002.

Tribble, Jeffery. Transformative Pastoral Leadership in the Black Church. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan Press, 2005.

Select Recent Book Publications of Program Graduates: 

(Graduates identified in bold italics)

Baker, Dori Grinenko. Doing Girlfriend Theology: God-Talk with Young Women. Pilgrim Press, 2005.

Baker, Dori Grinenko & Mercer, Joyce Ann. Lives to Offer: Accompanying Youth on Their Vocational Quests. Pilgrim Press, 2007.

Caldwell, Elizabeth. Making a Home for Faith: Nurturing the Spiritual Life of Your Children.United Church Press, 2000.

Caldwell, Elizabeth. Leaving Home with Faith: Nurturing the Spiritual Life of Our Youth.Pilgrim Press, 2002.

Kang, S. Steve. Unveiling the Socioculturally Constructed Multivoiced Self: Themes of Self Construction and Self Integration in the Narratives of Second-Generation Korean American Young Adults. University Press, 2003.

Conde-Frazier, Elizabeth; Kang, S. Steve; Parrett, Gary. A Many Colored Kingdom: Multicultural Dynamics for Spiritual Formation. Baker Academic Books, 2004.

Parker, Evelyn. Trouble Don't Last Always: Emancipatory Hope among African American Adolescents. Pilgrim Press, 2003.

Wimberly, Anne Streaty & Parker, Evelyn. In Search of Wisdom: Faith Formation in the Black Church. Abingdon Press, 2002.

Tribble, Jeffery. Transformative Pastoral Leadership in the Black Church. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan Press, 2005.

Theology and Ethics

The PhD in Theology and Ethics program prepares its students to pursue scholarship as teaching and writing theologians in the academy and the church. Our graduates teach in theological seminaries and undergraduate church-related colleges, as well as serve in denominational leadership .  The Concentration is based on an integration of theology and ethics, while allowing a student to have a major area of focus within the two. The Concentration presupposes that these disciplines cannot ultimately be separated from each other in Christian understanding.

  • Theology focus: Study of selected classical and contemporary theological constructions, with attention to their grounding in the broad stream of Christian tradition. It focusses particularly on biblical and Reformation trajectories that take seriously the issues raised in the modern and contemporary eras. A significant dimension of this engagement is the awareness of how theology contributes to moral deliberation, discourse and ethical praxis.
  • Ethics focus: Study of theological ethics or Christian social and political thought; study of a specific issue such as gender, race and class relations, war and peace, technology and culture, with attention devoted to related contextual, historical, and theological issues.

Admission

Admission Requirements:

    • Masters degree in religious or theological studies from an accredited college or university.
    • Proficiency in the English language. Applicants for whom English is not their first language will be required to give evidence of such competence (demonstrated by a TOEFL score).

 

A completed application consists of:

  • Application
  • Research statement
  • Professional experience/Resume
  • Writing sample (15 pages)
  • 3 letters of reference
  • Official Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score
  • Transcripts from all institutions attended
  • $75 application fee
  • Background check (conducted by the seminary, may take up to two weeks to complete)
  • Additional financial and church documents are required of international students in order to satisfy interrnal and federal requirements.

The admissions committee reserves the right to determine in its sole judgment whether an applicant is a suitable candidate for a specific concentration in the Ph.D. program.

Graduation

PhD (TE) Degree - 40 semester hours
TE Degree Grid

  • 7 semester hours of core courses required for all PhD students
  • 18-24 semester hours in theology, and/or ethics
  • 9-12 semester hours in a cognate concentration
  • 2 research tools: one in a language for academic research and a second research language or pertinent research methodology. A social science tool, such as ethnography, may require satisfactory completion of two graduate-level courses.
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination, typically covering the following areas:
    (1) Overview of the selected discipline of study 
    (2) Cognate discipline (e.g., history, ethics, biblical studies, or theology) 
    (3) Focused area of research 
    (4) Subject determined in consultation with advisor
  • Dissertation prospectus, to be discussed and approved at the time of the oral examination, or within three months following the satisfactory completion of oral exam, as negotiated with advisor.
  • Dissertation

Program Goals

Knowing:

  • To gain a knowledge and mastery of pertinent literature in the respective fields.
  • To learn the theories and methods of research and develop the critical thinking that prepares one to make contributions to scholarship promoting the work of the academy and the church.

Doing:

  • To learn how to teach the pertinent literature within a variety of institutional settings.
  • To show effectiveness as a critical and creative producer of theological and ethical knowledge.

Being:

  • To become scholars grounded in the faith traditions of the church and committed to serving the mission and goals of the church through the contribution of their scholarship and the theological insights that it affords.
  • To become competent practitioners of theology in the public square.

Courses

Select courses in this concentration:

• Readings in 20th Century Theologies 
• Contemporary Christologies 
• Contemporary Theologians (example: J. Moltmann and J. Sobrino) 
• Feminist/Womanist Theologies 
• Global Feminist Theologies and Biblical Interpretation 
• Latino/Latina theologies in North America 
• Latin American Theologies (in Spanish) 
• Theology in Migration 
• Postcolonial Theories and Theologies 
• Queering Theory and Theology 
• Reading Scripture as Theologians 
• Theologies of Howard Thurman and Martin Luther King, Jr. 
• Sin, Evil and Travail in Christian Theology 
• Theology of John Wesley 
• Theology of Kierkegaard, Barth and Bonhoeffer 
• Wesleyan and Methodist Theology and Spirituality 
• Reformed Theology 
• Theological Dialogue with Living Religions 
• Topics in the History of Christian Thought  
• Religion and the American Way 
• Christian Social and Political Thought: Topics 
• War and Peace 
• City of God 
• Moral Theology: Topics (examples of recent topics: The works of Hannah Arendt and Simone Weil, Christology and Ethics, Selected Themes in Christian social and political thought, Globalization and Christian Ethics, Technology, freedom, and justice: The works of George Grant and Albert Borgmann)

Faculty

Faculty:

nancy-bedford

Nancy Bedford

Georgia Harkness Professor of Applied Theology

Select Bibliography
La porfía de la resurrección. Ensayos desde el feminismo teológico latinoamericano. Colección FTL número 30. Buenos Aires: Kairós/Red del Camino, forthcoming

"We Wait for Hope". Meg Cox (ed.). Cynicism and Hope. Reclaiming Discipleship in a Post-Democratic Society. Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications, forthcoming

(With Guillermo Hansen.) Nuestra Fe. Buenos Aires: I. U. ISEDET, 2008

"Plantar huertas, escuchar a los árboles. Hacia una construcción de la subjetividad teológica feminista en migración": Stromata 64 (2008) 95-110

"Making Spaces: Latin American and Latina Feminist Theologies on the Cusp of Interculturality": María Pilar Aquino; Maria José Rosado Nunes (eds.), Feminist Intercultural Theology. Latina Approaches for a Just World. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2007, 49-69

 Barry Bryant copy

Barry Bryant

Associate Professor of Wesleyan and United Methodist Studies

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"The Israeli-Palestinian Situation: Theological Explorations" and "Reflections of a Recovered Christian Zionist" Quarterly Review, Spring 2005

Presidential address, "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness: Conflict of Values?" Wesley Philosophical Society, March 2004

"Class Leaders, Pastoral Care, and Christian Formation," in Discipleship Quarterly 18 (2003) 3:6-7

"Trinity, Technology, and the Meaning of Personhood," in Memphis Theological Seminary Journal, 38(2002)1:5-17

 Anne Joh crop

Anne Joh

Associate Professor of Systematic Theology

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Heart of the Cross: A Postcolonial Christology. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2006.

Terror, Trauma and Hope: A Postcolonial Spectrality of the Cross. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press.

“Teaching to Learn from the Other,” Keeping the Light, ed. Kate Ott and Melanie Harris, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.

“Postcolonialism in Fugue: Contrapuntality of Asian American Experience,” in New Overtures: Asian North American Theologies in the 21st Century, ed. Eleazar Fernandez. (Forthcoming from Sopher Press).

“Hybridity,” in Asian Pacific American Religious Cultures Encyclopedia, ed. Fumitaka Matsuoka and Jane Iwamura, ABC-CLIO. (Forthcoming)

“Loves’ Multiplicity: Jeong and Spivak’s Notes Toward Planetary Love” in Planetary Loves: GayatriSpivak, Postcoloniality, and Theology, ed. Stephen Moore and Mayra Rivera. (Fordham University Press, 2010).

 Stephen Ray

Stephen Ray

Neal F. and Ila A. Fisher Professor of Systematic Theology

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(Co-author) Black Church Studies: An Introduction. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2007.

"E-racing the Faith While Black. In: Being Black, Teaching Black: The Role of Black Church Studies in the Academy, N. Lynne Westfield ed. Nashville: Abingdon Press 2008.

"The End of Man: Human Rights, Christian Theology and The Rights of Human Persons," in Human Rights: Christian Influences and Issues, Frances Adeney and Arvind Sharma, eds. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2007.

(Contributor) Constructive Theology: A Contemporary Approach to Classical Themes, Serene Jones and Paul Lakeland, eds. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2004.

Do No Harm: Social Sin and Christian Responsibility. Minneapolis, Fortress Press, 2002.

 Brent Waters H

Brent Waters

Jerre and Mary Joy Stead Professor of Christian Social Ethics

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This Mortal Flesh: Incarnation and Bioethics. Grand Rapids: Brazos, forthcoming.

(Co-edited with F. LeRon Shults) Christology and Ethics. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, forthcoming.

"Disability and the Quest for Perfection: A Moral and Theological Inquiry," in Theology, Disability and the New Genetics: Why Science Needs the Church, John Swinton and Brian Brock, eds., T & T Clark, 2000.

The Family in Christian Social and Political Thought. Oxford University Press, 2007.

"Saving Us from Ourselves: Christology, Anthropology and the Seduction of Posthuman Medicine," in Future Perfect: God, Medicine and Human Dignity, Celia Deane-Drummond and Peter Manley Scott, eds. London and New York: T&T Clark, 2006

From Human to Posthuman: Christian Theology and Technology in a Postmodern World. Ashgate, 2006.

 

Graduates

Recent Book Publications of Program Graduates:

Lewis V. Baldwin, Between Cross and Crescent: Christian and Muslim Perspectives on Malcolm and Martin, 2002

Joanne Carlson Brown and Carole R. Bohn, Christianity, Patriarchy, and Abuse, 1989

James H. Cone, The Risks of Faith: The Emergence of a Black Theology of Liberation, 1968-1998, 2000

Reta Halteman Finger, et. al., The Wisdom of Daughters: Two Decades of the Voice of Christian Feminism, 2004

David E. Fitch, The Great Giveaway: Reclaiming the Mission of the Church from Big Business, Parachurch Organizations, Psychotherapy, Consumer Capitalism, and Other Modern Maladies, 2005

Mary Garman, Hidden in Plain Sight: Quaker Women's Writings, 1650 - 1700, 1995

Stephanie Mitchem, Introducing Womanist Theology, 2002

Michael L Stine, Losing the world but Finding the Harbor: a Spiritual Biography of Gustav Mahler, 1992

Emilie Townes, Womanist Ethics and the Cultural Production of Evil, 2006

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