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2017 Coloring Mental Health Collective Annual Symposium

Advocating for the Mental Wellness of Black and Brown People and Dismantling Oppressive Ideologies, Systems, and Behaviors that Cause Emotional Suffering

Presented by Coloring Mental Health Collective in conjunction with The Center for the Church and the Black Experience of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

September 9, 2017 | Englewood-Rust United Methodist Church, Chicago, Illinois

The 2017 Annual Symposium will focus on disrupting intimate partner violence and feature Rev. Dr. Monica A. Coleman, scholar, activist, and author of The Dinah Project: A Handbook for Congregational Response to Sexual Violence and her memoir, Bipolar Faith: A Black Woman's Journey with Depression and Faith, and Rev. Dr. Neichelle R. Guidry, recognized by TIME magazine as one of the "12 New Faces of Black Leadership," founder of shepreachesand author of Curating a World: Sermonic Words from a Young Woman Who Preaches.

Featured Speakers: Rev. Dr. Monica A. Coleman & Rev. Dr. Neichelle R. Guidry

Rev. Dr. Monica A. Coleman

A scholar and activist, Monica A. Coleman is committed to connecting faith and social justice. An ordained elder in the Michigan Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Coleman is Professor of Constructive Theology and African American Religions and Co-Director of the Center for Process Studies at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, California.

Leading foundations in the United States have supported Coleman’s research and education. Coleman has received funding from the Ford Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, the Association for Theological Schools, the Roothbert Fund and the Forum for Theological Exploration (formerly, the Fund for Theological Education).

Coleman is the author or editor of six books, and several articles and book chapters that focus on the role of faith in addressing critical social and philosophical issues. Her memoir “Bipolar Faith: a Black Woman’s Journey with Depression and Faith” shares her life-long dance with trauma and depression, and how she discovers a new and liberating vision of God. In “Not Alone: Reflections on Faith and Depression, Coleman offers a 40-day devotional wrestling with depression in a spiritual context.” Coleman wrote about church responses to sexual violence in “The Dinah Project: a Handbook for Congregational Response to Sexual Violence.” In “Making a Way Out of No Way: a Womanist Theology,” Coleman discusses inter-religious responses to the joys and pains of black women’s lives. She is the co-editor of “Creating Women’s Theologies: a Movement Engaging Process Thought” and editor of “Ain’t I a Womanist Too?: Third Wave Womanist Religious Thought.” Coleman’s articles have been featured in a variety of publications including ESSENCE, Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, Philosophia and Aspire: Women of Color Study Bible. Her current writing projects focus on the intersection of depression and faith, and theories of religious plurality.

A survivor of rape, Coleman became committed to speaking out against sexual violence in 1997. She founded and coordinated “The Dinah Project,” an organized church response to sexual violence, at Metropolitan Interdenominational Church in Nashville, TN. Her expertise in religion and sexual violence has taken her around the country to speak at churches, colleges, seminaries, universities, and regional and national conferences.

Coleman is active in ecumenical and academic religious guilds. Coleman served two terms as a member of the Faith and Order Commission for the National Council of Churches, USA. She currently serves on the Faith and Order Commission of the World Council of Churches. Coleman holds numerous leadership positions in the American Academy of Religion including the former co-chair of the Black Theology Group, a steering committee member of the Open and Relational Theologies Consultation, and membership on the Committee on the Status of People with Disabilities in the Profession. Coleman is also a member of the refereed societies, Society for the Study of Black Religion (SSBR) and the Institute for American Religious and Philosophical Thought (IARPT).

Coleman often teaches Bible study in her local church, and speaks widely on religion and sexuality, religious pluralism, churches & social media, mental health, and sexual and domestic violence.

Education:

  • A.B., Harvard-Radcliffe Colleges, Harvard University;

  • M.Div., Vanderbilt University Divinity School;

  • M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University

 

Rev. Dr. Neichelle R. Guidry

Rev. Dr. Neichelle R. Guidry is a spiritual daughter of New Creation Christian Fellowship of San Antonio, Texas, where the Bishop David Michael Copeland and the Rev. Dr. Claudette Anderson Copeland are her pastors and where she was ordained to ministry in 2010. She is a graduate of Clark Atlanta University (2007, BA, Lambda Pi Eta) and Yale Divinity School (2010, M.Div.), where she was the 2010 recipient of the Walcott Prize for Clear and Effective Public and Pulpit Speaking. She is also a graduate of Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (2017), where she completed her Doctor of Philosophy in the area of Liturgical Studies with a concentration in Homiletics. Her dissertation is entitled, "Towards a Womanist Homiletical Theology for Subverting Rape Culture."

Currently, she serves as the Liaison to Worship and Arts Ministries in the Office of the Senior Pastor at Trinity United Church of Christ on the South side of Chicago, where the Rev. Dr. Otis Moss, III is the Senior Pastor. She is the creator of shepreaches, a virtual community and professional development organization that aspires to uplift African-American millennial women in ministry through theological reflection, fellowship, and liturgical curation. She served as the 2016 Preacher/Pastor-In-Residence at the Black Theology and Leadership Institute at Princeton Theological Seminary. She was listed as one of “12 New Faces of Black Leadership” in TIME Magazine (January 2015). She was recognized for “quickly becoming one of her generation’s most powerful female faith leaders” on Ebony Magazine’s 2015 Power 100 list (December 2015), and one of “Ten Women of Faith Leading the Charge Ahead” by Sojourners. Additionally, Rev. Dr. Neichelle and the work of shepreaches were featured in the New York Times (April 3, 2015).  She is a contributor to What Would Jesus Ask?: Christian Leaders Reflect on His Questions of Faith (Time Books, 2015), and the author of Curating a World: Sermonic Words from a Young Woman Who Preaches (self-published, June 2016).

Speakers and Facilitators

Rev. Dr. Trina A. Armstrong
Assistant Professor of Pastoral Theology and Pastoral Care, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Reverend Dr. Trina Armstrong teaches pastoral care and counseling pastoral theology at Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary. Dr. Armstrong is a licensed marriage and family therapist especially skilled at working with traumatized families, children and adolescents. She recently provided individual, family and couples counseling with families with severely traumatized and emotionally disturbed children as a systemic family therapist with Nystrom and Associates. Dr. Armstrong has served as hospice Chaplain, a pastoral counselor at several churches, a crisis pregnancy and rape crisis centers, a homeless shelter, a halfway house for formerly incarcerated women, and a methadone clinic for people suffering from addiction. Reverend Armstrong is an ordained Itinerant Elder in the 4th Episcopal District of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church having served on the ministerial staffs at several AME church in Minnesota and California.

Dr. Armstrong has a PhD in Practical Theology-Spiritual Care and Counseling from the Claremont School of Theology, a Masters Degree in Spiritual Care and Counseling from Claremont School of Theology, a Masters Degree in Psychology--Marriage and Family Therapy from California Southern University, a Master of Divinity from Fuller Theological Seminary, and a Bachelor of Science degree in Information Systems from Golden Gate University.

Dr. Armstrong regularly lectures and preaches on trauma, healing, and wellness as her research, ministry, and clinical work focuses on the impact of historical and cultural trauma on African American children, adolescents, families, and relationships. Her article “Rot at the Core: Black Theology and Psychotherapy: An Integrative Approach Towards Liberation from Psychological Slavery” was published in a 2011 edition of The A.M.E. Church Review. Dr. Armstrong’s dissertation on pastoral care to single black mothers, Beyond the Veil of the Village: A Womanist Practical Theological Analysis of Single African American Mothers, Cultural and Relational Trauma, and Relationship Education Programs is published in the UMI dissertation database and a revision of this work and a forthcoming book on trauma-informed pastoral care and counseling in the Black Church will be published in 2016 and 2017.


Rev. Dr. Nicholas Grier
Visiting Professor of Pastoral Theology, Counseling and Culture, Claremont School of Theology

A native of Atlanta, GA, Nicholas Grier’s writing, speaking, and counseling focus on the experiences of Black and Brown people and engage a womanist critique of culture. He currently serves as Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow in Spiritual Care and Pastoral Counseling at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, California.

Privileging the experiences of persons on the margins of society, Grier enjoys fostering cultures of self-awareness, resistance, healing, and liberation on the path to human flourishing. He works to engage faith communities, clinical counseling practice, the academy, and public on issues related to racism, sexism, Black male identity, liberating faith, and depth understandings of the personality. As teacher, Grier works to inspire present and future faith leaders to cultivate life-giving ministries of care and justice. Grier is an ordained Baptist minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and served as Associate Pastor for Pastoral Care at Second Baptist Church, Evanston, IL. Most recently he served as Associate Staff Minister at Third Baptist Church of Chicago. As pastoral theologian, he has taught for the course The Practice of Ministry at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

He is a 2015-2016 Forum for Theological Exploration (FTE) Doctoral Dissertation Fellow. His dissertation, Caring for the Mental Health of Black Men: Engaging Invisibility, Hyper-Visibility, and Devaluation in Urban Black Males Toward Human Flourishing, is a qualitative study drawing on the narratives of Black men in Chicago as the starting point to develop a new grounded theory for pastoral care and counseling. The narratives of Black men are put in dialogue with critical race theory, Black feminism, 238 CLAREMONT SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY womanist pastoral theology, Black psychology, psychoanalytic theory, and Black pastoral theology with an aim toward human flourishing.

Grier is the founder of Coloring Mental Health Collective, LLC, a community organizing team advocating for the mental wellness of Black and Brown people and dismantling oppressive ideologies, systems, and behaviors that cause emotional suffering. A primary goal is to use innovation and creativity to foster safe and transformative spaces for communities to imagine, dialogue, and actualize a future of material, spiritual, and psychological well-being for persons on the margins of society. In his downtime he enjoys sports, listening to jazz & neo-soul music, spending time in nature, and connecting with life-giving friends & family.


Dr. Elizabeth Pierre
Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling and Counseling Psychology, North Park Theological Seminary

Elizabeth Odette Pierre is completed her PhD in the pastoral theology, personality, and culture clinical track program at Garrett­Evangelical Theological Seminary in Evanston, IL. Her dissertation explores how atonement theologies may inadvertently revictimize Black Christian women survivors of sexual violence. She holds a master's degree in counseling psychology from Boston College and served as a clinical fellow at Center for Religion and Psychotherapy in Chicago, IL. She is currently a teaching fellow at North Park Seminary and North Park University in the School Adult Learning. Her research interests involve learning how to provide adequate pastoral care for trauma survivors and the role of forgiveness and reconciliation in violent contexts within the United States and abroad.

Schedule

Saturday, September 9, 2017

8:00 a.m. On-Site Registration
8:30 a.m. Opening Plenary
9:00 a.m. Session I: Caring for the Souls of Survivals of Intimate Partner Violence
Dr. Elizabeth Pierre
9:35 a.m. Session II: Deconstructing Black Masculinities that Perpetuate Intimate Partner Violence
Rev. Dr. Nicholas Grier
10:10 a.m. Session III: Betrayal Trauma, Relational Trauma and Adults Who Experience Them
Rev. Dr. Trina Armstrong
10:55 a.m. Community Response
11:50 a.m. Lunch
12:45 p.m. Keynote Address
Rev. Dr. Monica A. Coleman and Rev. Dr. Neichelle Guidry
1:45 p.m. Clinical Response to the Keynote Address
Dr. Trina Armstrong, Dr. Nicholas Grier and Dr. Elizabeth Pierre
2:10 p.m. Community Response
2:40 p.m. Next Steps
3:15 p.m. Closing Ritual

Musical Director: Dre Dennis

Dre Dennis

Dre Dennis born in the great city of Atlanta, GA has been trained as a drummer/musician since the age of 3. He attended the prestigious North Atlanta High School of the Performing Arts (NAHS), where he became the principle percussionist for the schools top performing bands, orchestras, theatrical plays, and chorus ensembles. After high school, Dre was accepted into Georgia State University music school where he has built long-lasting music and entertainment industry relationships. Dre has transitioned his music career to now singing, songwriting, and producing for the past several years. In this short time frame, Dre has shared the stage with many great national and international recording artists and has been working as a musical director/composer with his band Collective Element for various groups, artists, venues and stage plays. His most notable accomplishment was as the composer, arranger, lyricist and musical director for the hit stage play “Pretty Hurts: The Musical”, which will be releasing a forthcoming soundtrack. Not only is Dre a seasoned entertainer, he is also an entrepreneur and CEO/Founder of DreDrumming Music LLC, where they produce shows, events and help to nurture new up and coming talent.

Symposium Founder: Dr. Nicholas Grier

A native of Atlanta, GA, Nicholas Grier’s writing, speaking, and counseling focus on the experiences of Black and Brown people and engage a womanist critique of culture. He currently serves as Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow in Spiritual Care and Pastoral Counseling at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, California.

Privileging the experiences of persons on the margins of society, Grier enjoys fostering cultures of self-awareness, resistance, healing, and liberation on the path to human flourishing. He works to engage faith communities, clinical counseling practice, the academy, and public on issues related to racism, sexism, Black male identity, liberating faith, and depth understandings of the personality. As teacher, Grier works to inspire present and future faith leaders to cultivate life-giving ministries of care and justice. Grier is an ordained Baptist minister in the Progressive National Baptist Convention and served as Associate Pastor for Pastoral Care at Second Baptist Church, Evanston, IL. Most recently he served as Associate Staff Minister at Third Baptist Church of Chicago. As pastoral theologian, he has taught for the course The Practice of Ministry at the University of Chicago Divinity School.

He is a 2015-2016 Forum for Theological Exploration (FTE) Doctoral Dissertation Fellow. His dissertation, Caring for the Mental Health of Black Men: Engaging Invisibility, Hyper-Visibility, and Devaluation in Urban Black Males Toward Human Flourishing, is a qualitative study drawing on the narratives of Black men in Chicago as the starting point to develop a new grounded theory for pastoral care and counseling. The narratives of Black men are put in dialogue with critical race theory, Black feminism, 238 CLAREMONT SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY womanist pastoral theology, Black psychology, psychoanalytic theory, and Black pastoral theology with an aim toward human flourishing.

Grier is the founder of Coloring Mental Health Collective, LLC, a community organizing team advocating for the mental wellness of Black and Brown people and dismantling oppressive ideologies, systems, and behaviors that cause emotional suffering. A primary goal is to use innovation and creativity to foster safe and transformative spaces for communities to imagine, dialogue, and actualize a future of material, spiritual, and psychological well-being for persons on the margins of society. In his downtime he enjoys sports, listening to jazz & neo-soul music, spending time in nature, and connecting with life-giving friends & family.

 Education:

  • B.M., Columbus State University;

  • M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary;

  • Cert. in Psychotherapy, Center for Religion and Psychotherapy at Chicago;

  • Ph.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary

Registration & CEUs

General Registration: $50
Student Registration (high school, college, graduate school/seminary): $20
Continuing Education Units: Additional $25

The Center for Religion and Psychotherapy of Chicago is an approved continuing education unit (CEU) provider. This program is recognized as providing Continuing Education hours for Licensed Social Workers/Licensed Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Professional Counselors, and Licensed Clinical Professional Counselors (IDFPR license #159-000787) for the Coloring Mental Health Collective 2017 Symposium for an additional $25 beyond the conference registration fee. Participants must attend the entire conference to be eligible for CEUs.

Register Now

 

September 9, 2017
8:00am

Englewood-Rust United Methodist Church

6400 S Stewart Ave
Chicago , IL 60621

2017 ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM:
DISRUPTING INTIMATE
PARTNER VIOLENCE

  • Every 9 seconds a US woman is physically abused.
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been physically abused by an intimate partner.
  • 1 in 7 women and 1 in 18 men have been stalked. Stalking causes the target to fear she/he or someone close to her/him will be harmed or killed.
  • Every 98 seconds another American is sexually assaulted.
  • 1 out of every 6 American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime (14.8% completed, 2.8% attempted).
  • About 3% of American men—or 1 in 33—have experienced an attempted or completed rape in their lifetime.

NCADV Domestic Violence National Statistics (2015).
Retrieved from www.ncadv.org.