Programs of Study

Certification Studies

Certification Studies

Our six certification programs offer church leaders ways to enhance skills and professional stature in ministries they love.

Making it as simple as 1, 2, 3...

1. If you have a passion for ministry, we invite you to take a course in
one of our 6 certification programs to see how you like it.

2. It could lead to a professional certification that would enhance your
opportunities for lay ministry.

3. Or it could be the first step on the path to becoming ordained as a
Deacon, or as continuing education for those already ordained.


Which one are you passionate about?

Each of the following 6 programs of study involves a cluster of
5 courses and meets UMC certification requrirements.

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Eliminating the hassle and expense...

  • Courses are available during 2-week intensives on campus in January and July, or
    during the regular fall and spring terms.
  • Online courses will soon be available, so you can work from home.
  • Monies are available to offset costs for registered candidates for certification through GBHEM.


No time like now!

If you're yearning to enhance your ministry, now's the time to immerse yourself in dynamic courses taught by outstanding faculty. Learn cutting-edge techniques and practices in the field.

Apply Online Requirements

For more information...

Admissions Office: 847-866-3945 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Or contact The United Methodist Church's GBHEM for more information:
www.gbhem.org/certification/cert_home.html


Admissions RequirementsAdmissions ProceduresAdmissions Application

BGTS

Deacon and Basic Graduate Theological Studies

Deacon Studies for United Methodist Students

Persons ordained as deacons in The United Methodist Church are engaged in ministries of word and service that connect church and world. The process of ordination includes both educational preparation and annual conference review. Garrett-Evangelical cooperates with annual conferences and districts to support students in completing the educational requirements and assists with on-site mentoring and support. Persons complete educational requirements through one of two routes:

1. the completion of a Master of Arts or Master of Divinity degree

or

2. the completion of Basic Graduate Theological Studies at Garrett-Evangelical in conjunction with a master's degree in an area of service (e.g., counseling, social work, peace studies) or in conjunction with United Methodist certification studies (see tab above).

For further information on deacon orders, check with your annual conference registrar and the following link to the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry: Section of Deacons and Diaconal Ministries.

Basic Graduate Theological Studies for Deacon Studies
Completion Requirements 2010-2011

Nine courses are required, one from each of the following areas (two courses from UM Studies). Three semester hours per course is the recommended minimum.

Old Testament Interpretation

11-500

Introduction to Old Testament

4

New Testament Interpretation

12-500

Introduction to New Testament

4

Church History

13-501

History of Christian Thought & Practice 1

3

Theology

21-505
or
21-506
or
21-507
or
21-508

Introduction to Theology

Doctrine of God/Doctrine of Creation

Christology/Theological Anthropology

Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, Eschatology

3

Ethics (meets Mission of the Church requirement)

22-501
or
22-504
or
22-506

Church and Society

Church and Community

Christian Moral Reasoning

3

Worship

31-511
or
31-542

Christian Public Worship

United Methodist Worship

3

Evangelism

34-537
or
34/21-628

Empowering the Congregation for Evangelism

Theology of Evangelism

3

United Methodist Studies

40-674

United Methodist Studies: Wesley & 19th Century

3

40-673

United Methodist Studies: 20th Century to Present

3

Total 29 semester hours to complete

Admissions RequirementsAdmissions ProceduresAdmissions Application

Course of Study

The Course of Study School

The Course of Study School at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary offers licensed Local Pastors the opportunity to fulfill the United Methodist Church's requirements through a five-year program of theological study that promotes biblical knowledge and pastoral leadership. The School is conducted each summer for part- and full-time Local Pastors in English, Spanish, and Hmong. It follows a curriculum established by the General Board for Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church. Extension Course of Study Schools asssociated with Garrett-Evangelical are located in Indiana and Springfield, Illinois. Students from African-American Methodist denominations - AME, AME Zion and CME - are weclome when recommended by denominational leaders. Students from other denominations may be admitted at the director's discretion.

To learn more about Course of Study or Advanced Course of Study, click here.

Enrichment Studies

Enrichment Studies


For continuing education or exploring a degree program. A maximum of 5 courses may be taken as an enrichment student (Some courses are not available to enrichment students.)

Biblical Studies

Admissions RequirementsAdmissions ProceduresAdmissions Application

The PhD in Biblical Studies prepares persons for teaching in colleges and international theological institutions, for scholarship, and for denominational leadership.  Students develop a major in either Old Testament or New Testament and a minor in the other testament or another area of the theological curriculum, e.g,  theology, ethics, church history (Roman era), to name a few.  Students are prepared with a comprehensive understanding of the theological, cultural, hermeneutical and exegetical issues facing contemporary biblical study.  In addition, as other students in the Garrett-Evangelical PhD program, students are equipped to address the inter-disciplinary issues in theological study.

Pre-requisites for Admissions:

  • Basic knowledge of Hebrew and Greek (one-year each) 
  • MTS or MDiv that includes at least 4 biblical studies courses

 Requirements: 40 semester hours[1]

  •  7 semester hours of core courses required for all Ph.D. students
    Hermeneutics (3)
    Teaching Seminar (2)
    Research Seminar (2)
  • 9 semester hours in core biblical studies courses 
    Biblical Interpretation (3)
    Issues in Biblical History and Archeology (3)
    Biblical Theology (3)
  • 9-12 semester hour major in OT or NT
  • 6-9 semester hour minor in the other testament or another area of the theological curriculum
  • 6- 9 semester hours in electives (determined with advisor)
  • 3 languages: Hebrew, Greek, and a modern language to enhance international and interdisciplinary study of biblical research and scholarship.
  • 4 written qualifying examinations and an oral examination covering the following areas:
    (1) Major area
    (2) Minor area
    (3) Focused area of research
    (4)Open – to be determined with adviser
  • Dissertation prospectus to be discussed and approved at the time of the oral examination or within three months following the satisfactory completion of oral exam, as negotiated with advisor.
  • Dissertation

Faculty:

 Present faculty members in biblical studies have focused research on cultural, literary, and historical approaches to biblical study, the ethics of biblical research, and the impact of biblical studies in global Christianity.  Key faculty assisting with the program include:

  • Cheryl Anderson, Associate Professor of Old Testament
  • Julie Duncan, Associate Professor of Old Testament
  • G. Brooke Lester, Affiliate Faculty in Biblical Studies
  • Jim Papandrea, Assistant Professor of Church History
  • Beth Sheppard, Assistant Professor of Theological Bibliography; Director, United Library
  • Osvaldo Vena, Professor of New Testament
  • KK Yeo, Harry R. Kendall Professor of New Testament

Select Publications by Program Faculty in Biblical Studies:

Cheryl Anderson.  Ancient Laws and Contemporary Controversies: The Need for Inclusive Biblical Interpretation. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009.

Cheryl Anderson.  Women, Ideology, and Violence: Critical Theory and the Construction of Gender in the Book of the Covenant and the Deuteronomic Law.  London: T&T Clark, 2004.

Cheryl B. Anderson, "Reflections in an Interethnic/racial Era on Interethnic/racial Marriage in Ezra.”  In They Were All Together in One Place: Toward Minority Biblical Criticism.  Edited by Randall C. Bailey, Tat-siong Benny Liew, and Fernando F. Segovia.  Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2009.

Cheryl B. Anderson, "The Eighth Commandment: A Way to King's 'Beloved Community'?”  In The Ten Commandments: The Reciprocity of Faithfulness.  Edited by William P. Brown.  Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2004.

Julie A. Duncan.  "Book of Deuteronomy." In The Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Edited by Lawrence H. Schiffman and James C. VanderKam.  New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Julie A. Duncan.  "Excerpted Texts of Deuteronomy at Qumran." Revue de Qumran 18/69, 1996.

Julie A. Duncan. “4QDeuteronomy b, e, h, j, k1, k2, k3, l, m.” Discoveries in the Judean Desert XIV. Oxford: Clarendon, 1995.    

Duncan, Julie Ann. “New Readings for the ‘Blessing of Moses’ from Qumran.” Journal of Biblical Literature 114/2 (1995): 273-290.

Duncan, Julie Ann.  “Considerations of 4QDeutj in Light of the ‘All Souls Deuteronomy’ and Cave 4 Phylactery Texts.” Proceedings of the International Congress on the Dead Sea Scrolls, Madrid, 18-21 March 1991, eds. J. Trebolle Barrera and L. Vegas Montaner, 199-215.  Leiden: Brill, 1992.

G. Brooke Lester.  “Admiring Our Savvy Ancestors: Abraham's and Jacob's Rhetoric of Negotiation” Koinonia XV (2003): 81-94.

G. Brook Lester.  “Hebrew Bible and Higher Education.” http://anumma.com.

Green, Jennifer S., G. Brooke Lester, and Joseph F. Scrivner.  Handbook to a Grammar for Biblical Hebrew. Rev. ed. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2005.

Jim Papandrea.  The Wedding of the Lamb: A Historical Approach to the Book of Revelation. Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2010.

Jim Papandrea. At Home with the Word. Scripture Commentary Contributor, 2011 Lectionary Year Edition.  Chicago: Liturgy Training Publications, 2010.

Jim Papandrea.  Pray (Not Just Say) The Lord’s Prayer. Liguori, MO: Liguori Publications, 2009.

Beth Sheppard.  “Ruth” and “Baruch/Letter of Jeremiah”, Translator (Greek to English) for the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear LXX software program edition, Libronix Corp, David A. deSilva and Randall Tan.  Bellingham, WA: Bible Logos Inc., 2009.

Beth Sheppard.  “Another Look: Johannine ‘Subordinationist Christology’ and the Roman Family.”  In New Currents through John. Edited by Thomas Thatcher and Fransico Lozada.    Atlanta, GA:  Scholars Press, 2006.

Beth Sheppard. “The Rise of Rome:  The Emergence of a New Mode for Exploring the Context of the Fourth Gospel.” ATLA Proceedings 57 (2003): 175-187.

Osvaldo Vena.  The Parousia and Its Rereadings. The Development of the Eschatological Consciousness in the Writings of the New Testament. Studies in Biblical Literature  Vol. 27. New York, NY: Peter Lang, 2001.

Osvaldo Vena.  Apocalipsis (Revelation). Justo L. González, general editor. Series “Conozca su Biblia.” Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress, 2008.

Osvaldo Vena.  Evangelio de Marcos. Series “Comentarios para exégesis y traducción.” Edesio Sánchez and Esteban Voth editors. Miami, Florida: Sociedades Bíblicas Unidas, 2008.

Osvaldo Vena.“The Markan Construction of Jesus as Disciple of the Kingdom.”  In Mark: Texts @ Context Series.  Edited by Teresa Okure, Daniel M. Patte and Nicole Wilkinson Duran.  Fortress Press, 2010.

K. K. Yeo. Musing with Confucius and Paul. Oregon: Wipf & Stock, 2008.

K.K. Yeo, ed. Navigating Romans through Cultures.  Edinburgh: Continuum, 2004.

K.K. Yeo. Biblical Rhetoric. (in Chinese)  Beijing: Religious Culture Press, 2007.



[1] 2-3 courses in a student’s coursework are to be taken from Northwestern University or another approved university or theological school.

 

African-American Congregational Leadership

DMin Home     Admissions Requirements      Admissions Procedures      Application Materials      Tuition Costs for the Garrett-Evangelical DMin Program

The African American Church has a unique history and culture that impacts every aspect of its life, including its worship style, forms of Christian education, methods of administration and governance, and interpersonal relationships within local congregations. The African American Congregational Leadership track recognizes this uniqueness and offers students an opportunity to enhance their capacity to engage effectively in ministry within this context. For this reason, students admitted into this track must be engaged in ministry that is significant to African Americans or the African American context.

Students will cover such issues as how to approach biblical studies, how to engage in theological reflection, how to undertake church administration, and how to perform evangelism and Christian formation from an African American perspective. The courses dealing with these issues are taught by one of the largest groups of African American scholars on the faculty at a United Methodist seminary. These faculty members are supplemented by a cadre of highly accomplished African American alums of Garrett-Evangelical, including Rev. Dr. Carlisle Fielding Stewart and Bishop Beverly Shamana.

In January and late-June students will attend two-week intensive terms during which they will take two courses. These courses will cover topics related specifically to the African American church, as well as providing fundamental research skills for deepening the student's academic facility and helping the student better analyze the local congregation.

For the final project, students will apply creativity in connecting the theories studied with the practice of ministry, and will relate his or her own practice of ministry to fundamental theory in the disciplines appropriated within the African American context.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:

January - attend two courses

Summer - attend two courses

Fall - attend seminar

Year 2:

January - attend two courses

Spring - attend seminar

Summer - write professional identity paper, begin framing final project proposal (does not require coming to campus)

Fall - attend seminar

Year 3:

 

January - research for final project proposal (does not require coming to campus)

Spring - attend final seminar

Summer - research for final project (does not require coming to campus)

Early Fall - receive approval for final project and conduct ministry intervention (does not require coming to campus)

Late Fall - Write final project paper describing impact of ministry intervention and defend it.

Information on the Seminars

Students in the Doctor of Ministry track in Congregational Leadership are required to participate in four of six seminars.  Intended to help clergy become more effective leaders in their vocational settings, the seminars focus on developing increased leadership capacity and application of management principles in congregation and faith-based organizations.  The themes include:

§  Developing Personal Leadership

§  Exploring Leadership in my Mission

§  Financial and General Management

§  Building External Relationships

§  Managing People & Resources

§  Capstone Program: The Leadership Challenge

List of Possible Courses

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"Biblical Hermeneutics in the African-American Context"

"African-American Church Administration and Congregational Development"

"Black Ministry Engaging Historical Challenges"

"Leadership for Pastor and Laity"

Congregational Leadership

DMin Home     Admissions Requirements      Admissions Procedures      Application Materials      Tuition Costs for the Garrett-Evangelical DMin Program

Recognizing the complex demands placed on pastoral leaders to serve as heralds of the gospel, teachers of the Christian heritage, chief administrative officers of the church, long-range planners, budget directors, program innovators and implementers, and personnel managers, the G-ETS Congregational Leadership track, partnering with Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management,  offers the best possible mix of practical management training and theological education to enhance a pastor's ability to be a more effective leader. Students in this track will develop the necessary skills to understand their own leadership styles, recognize how to best lead in their local congregations, and prepare their congregations to be change agents in their respective contexts.

Students in this track will attend four sessions in Evanston per year. In mid-Fall and mid-Spring students will participate in three-day seminars led by Kellogg and G-ETS faculty, covering the latest in management and leadership studies. Each session will conclude with a discussion led by the Garrett-Evangelical faculty member who will facilitate the students' theological reflection on the content from the seminar.

In January and late-June students will attend two-week intensive terms during which they will take two courses. These courses will cover topics related specifically to church leadership, such as stewardship and renewal, as well as providing fundamental research skills for deepening the student's academic facility and helping the student better analyze the local congregation.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:

January - attend two courses

Summer - attend two courses

Fall - attend Kellogg seminar

Year 2:

January - attend two courses

Spring - attend Kellogg seminar

Summer - write professional identity paper, begin framing final project proposal (does not require coming to campus)

Fall - attend Kellogg seminar

Year 3:

 

January - research for final project proposal (does not require coming to campus)

Spring - attend final Kellogg seminar

Summer - research for final project (does not require coming to campus)

Early Fall - receive approval for final project and conduct ministry intervention (does not require coming to campus)

Late Fall - Write final project paper describing impact of ministry intervention and defend it.

Information on the Kellogg Seminars

Students in the Doctor of Ministry track in Congregational Leadership are required to participate in four of six seminars developed in collaboration with the Center for Non-Profit Management at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management.  Intended to help clergy become more effective leaders in their vocational settings, the seminars are led by faculty members from both schools and will focus on developing increased leadership capacity and application of management principles in congregation and faith-based organizations.  The themes include:

§  October, Year 1 - Developing Personal Leadership

§  April/May, Year 1 - Exploring Leadership in my Mission

§  October, Year2 - Financial and General Management

§  April/May, Year 2 - Building External Relationships

§  October, Year 3 - Managing People & Resources

§  April/May, Year 3 - Capstone Program: The Leadership Challenge

Dates for upcoming seminar sessions may be found at http://www.transformativeleaders.org/events-programs

The first and second days of each session are held at the Wiebolt Building on Kellogg's downtown Chicago campus from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. The third day DMin seminar is held at Garrett-Evangelical. Meals on the first and second days (except dinner the second day) are included in the course fee. Additional information will be sent to participants prior to each session.

Participants who complete all six seminars (two of which are not included in DMin coursework or fees) will earn a Certificate issued jointly by Garrett-Evangelical and the Kellogg School of Management.

 Sessions typically begin at 8 a.m. on the first day and conclude at 5 p.m. on the second.  Participants who complete all six seminars (two of which would be independent of the DMin coursework) will earn a Certificate of Excellence in Church Leadership, issued jointly by Garrett-Evangelical and the Kellogg School of Management.

For specific questions about the Kellogg seminars, including registration information, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

List of Possible Courses

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"Spiritual Disciplines for Leadership"

"Leadership for Pastor and Laity"

"Stewardship and Institutional Development"

"Administration and Leadership"

Mission in the Contemporary United States

DMin Home     Admissions Requirements      Admissions Procedures      Application Materials      Tuition Costs for the Garrett-Evangelical DMin Program

Historically, the church could count on being well-received in the United States. Christian beliefs were widespread among the American populace and there was general agreement by most Americans concerning the Christian values that should guide how people lived and society was ordered. However, as many local congregations and their pastors can attest, times have changed. The church no longer has pride of place in the American culture, and a great many local congregations are languishing for lack of being able to connect effectively with the people in their own communities.

The local congregation in the United States today is better understood as a mission outpost than as a "neighborhood church." The Garrett-Evangelical Mission in the Contemporary United States track understands this, and gives students the ability to analyze the culture and the church like a missionary so that they can more effectively lead their congregations in engaging the people around them. They will do this by taking courses dealing with the sociology of American religion, methods of mission work, and the theology of evangelism. More than just theoretical, the students will use case studies from local congregations to consider what the best practices of mission would be in specific situations. Issues surrounding how to plant, revitalize and grow congregations will be covered.

Students in this track will attend two-week intensive terms in January and late-June during which they will take two courses each. These courses will cover topics related specifically to the mission of the church in the United States, as well as providing fundamental research skills for deepening the student's academic facility and helping the student better analyze the local congregation.

Sample Schedule (based on school years beginning with the Fall semester):

Year 1:
January - attend two courses
Summer - attend two courses

Year 2:
January - attend two courses
Summer - attend two courses and begin work on mid-program material

Year 3:
Fall - submit mid-program material for approval and begin ministry intervention
January - complete ministry intervention and begin writing paper
Spring - complete final paper, defend it, and graduate

List of Possible Courses

The following are a list of courses that are commonly offered as part of this track:

"Evangelism, Church Growth, and Ecclesiology"

"Stewardship and Institutional Development"

"Reading the Culture"

"Leadership for Pastor and Laity"

No time like now!

If you're yearning to enhance your ministry, now's the time to immerse yourself in dynamic courses taught by outstanding faculty.

Apply OnlineRequirements

For more information...

Admissions Office: 847-866-3945 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

UMC Logo Garrett-Evangelical, a seminary related to
The United Methodist Church, welcomes
students from a wide range of faith traditions.